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The Work and Important Events of Tom Lohre 

 
Still Life, Oil on canvas, 16" x 16", 1974, Property of Chuck Lohre
His first painting in earnest. A still life done in his room in his family home. He had returned home after being offered a job at his father's business. He moved from Lexington, Kentucky to Cincinnati after two years of college at the University of Kentucky. The painting was a very detailed work but the substrate was faulty and has started to peel.  
 

Still Life, Acrylic on canvas, 24" x 30", 1974, Property of Thomas Lohre, senior, $400 

Painted as a class work. His teacher Howard Storm arranged a mess of classroom furniture into a pile and had his student paint it.  
 

Mosquito in the Air, Acrylic on canvas, 40" x 30", Property of Susan Lohre 

For some reason the teacher asked the class to paint a familiar thing in a unfamiliar way and Tom choose to paint clouds looking straight up.  
 

Clare E. Beatty, Oil on canvas, 36" x 24", 1975 

   

Linda, Oil on canvas, 24" x 36", 1976, Property of Tim Kinduell 

Tom's first commission. Linda was Tim's girlfriend and Tim was Tom's close friend.  

Bachelor of Arts, University of Northern Kentucky, Highland Heights, KY, 1973-76 

Nude Man, Charcoal on paper, 30" x 40", 1976, Property of the Bloch Estate
This is a student work done during Tom's first years in New York City. He was working on his figure drawing and since he lived on the gay street in town he would finish by putting a huge dong on his figures and sell them on the street! Bruce McGowan bought this drawing and he later gave it to Birdie Bloch. In many ways it was this drawing that got Tom a foot hold in art in the city.  

Man with Horse, Copy of a Thomas Lawrence from the MET, Oil on canvas, 24" x 36", 1977, Property of Susan Lohre 

Merchant's Wife, Copy of a Thomas Lawrence from the MET, Oil on canvas, 1977, Property of the Artist, Graphite stencil of the MET on back 
Painted on location in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as part of Tom studies.  

1977 News Release titled "There are some things money can't buy. Do you have a fantasy you have always wanted to experience? Maybe it is flying , living in another time, being somewhere else, or living in a foreign land. Most people will never live out their fantasies and even if they were affordable you can not turn back time or attach wings to your back. There are just some things that money can not buy. Until now! You can not use a camera in your mind. But your can describe your fantasy. You can tell how you felt, what your were doing, who was there, and where it all happened. Maybe after doing so the listener would get the picture. If you con only have a painting of your fantasy. A painting that has all the mood, excitement and mystery of the real thing. My name is Tom Lohre and ever since childhood I have wanted to paint the pictures in my head. But I could not do that until I could paint all that was around me and then learn to paint what I could not see as if it was real. Certainly a task that took many years. But those years are in the past and now I can offer you the reward of my labor as I have for many. Being Peter Pan, a Russian Cossack, an astronaut or floating down the grand canal in Venice are all fantasies I have painted for people who dreamed of being there. Now I can offer you the chance of being there too. We can begin work as soon as you call. Remember that the painting I do you for you will last for hundreds of years and after you and I have gone people will never know if it was real or not. So in a way you would have done the impossible.  

78 Income $5,000 
 
Jaws, Oil on board, 36" x 24", 1976, Sold to Randy Lohre at auction for $20 
 
Elizabeth Cannon as Marchesa Durazo, Copy from the MET, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", January 15th,1978, Property of Classical Glass, Cincinnati; featured in Untied Press International photo and story 
 
Second Place in Painting, Summer Fair, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1978 
 
Elizabeth Taylor, Oil on canvas, 16"X 20", 1977, Property of Bob Martin

Birdie Bloch, Oil on canvas, 36"X 24", 1977, Property of the Bloch Family 

A remembrance of things past, Mrs. Bloch used to spend the Summers at this resort on Long Island and when see met Tom she commissioned a portrait of those memories. Painted shortly after Bruce McGowan, Birdie took a liking to the painter and it was the start of many years of friendship. Birdie on a regular basis would commission new works. She held a famous salon and entertained many notable New Yorkers.  

 

John Vincent, Oil on canvas, 30"X 24", February 19th,1978, Owner unknown
Painted as Tom 's first commission in New York City. He painted the work for ten French apple pies! The painting was later exhibited at the Axis Gallery in Soho and shortly afterwards Steve Martin was seen appearing on the cover of New York Magazine with a fish coming out of his jacket. John was from a fishing village in France and to illustrate his attachment to his home country he agreed to embrace the fish. Later he cook it and we ate it!  
Leslie Harlip Brushing for Bucks Village Voice 3/6 1978 
 
Bob Martin, Oil canvas, August 1978, Property of Bob Martin,

Painted as one of the first fantasy portraits. Bob was always a fan of the movie 2001 Space Odyssey and commissioned a portrait of him in the capsule of the escape spacecraft.  

 

James Kinduell, Oil on canvas, September 1978, Cincinnati; Ellen came to visit
 
Greek Wedding June 78, $50, for the owner of the corner grocery store
 
Mike Fink's Restaurant, Oil on canvas, 1978, 28" x 18", Property of the artist, Sold to Captain Beatty, June 3rd, 1979
Painted in New York City as a sort of home sick piece. Tom grew up on the Ohio River and worked on this stern wheeler converted into a restaurant. His job was to replace the light bulbs, take out the trash, paint and tend to the diesel engines that supplied the power. His boss was a old black man who had spent his life working for the owner of the restaurant. The owner was legendary river man John Beatty. Beatty had various jobs on the river from piloting logs rafts down river to floating restaurants. His father did all the same things his son did but John wanted to best his dad and consequently far exceeded his father. His father had a hot dog stand on the river so John had two of the biggest and best converted stern wheeler restaurants on the Ohio River. His father had a small harbor service and John had a company that ran all the harbor service for Cincinnati.  
The painting shows the floating restaurant from a vantage point above it. In the foreground is some river brush and from it the ramps that lead to the steamboat. You see the front of the stern wheeler with a light coming from the kitchen. In the restaurant itself you can see small table lights. The sun is setting and through the light is the silhouette of the famous John Robeling Bridge. Built in 1860, it is the center piece of the river between Covington, Kentucky and Cincinnati, Ohio.  
The impetus for the for the painting came from a postcard. Later Tom discovered that he did not have the boat sitting properly in the water. Although no one has pointed it out it shows the intimate nature between the artist and his work.
 

United Press International Master's painting your face Cincinnati Post 8/25 1978  

Bob Martin, Oil on canvas, 30" x 30", August 1978, Property of Bob Martin, Paid $150
 
Lloyd Fienberg 78 $1,200 
 
Lloyd & Didi Harris 
 
Lionel Larner December 78 $800 
Article in Cinti Post about painting old masters, November 2nd, 1978  
Jock Itch Jan, Oil canvas, January 1st, 1979, Property of Jerry Ragni Estate, Sold for $750 
 
Alex 
 
1979 News Release 
A spirited, skillful young man with unexpected ideas. Tom is no new comer to the art world. Tom explains: "The world is in need of new translations of ancient feelings. The desire of man to believe that there was a first time for all feelings require new expressions and symbols for the environment man lives in today. It is these inner feelings. these ancient emotions, that need to be reiterated using the symbolism of Today."  
 
Through the surface and content of his work, a mythical display of emotion is recorded. capturing the sparkle of reality and the subtle difference between representation and presence. Tom says," Questions are posed in reality. Answers are revealed in dreams.  
Kaku, Oil on canvas, 24" x 24", January 23rd, 1979, Owner unknown 
 
Sharon as the Nine of Wands, Oil on canvas, 48" x 72", January 1979, Property of Charles Lohre, Valued at $7,000 
 
Asueque Basaran (unfinished), Oil on canvas, February 1st, 1979
 
The Deal, Oil on Canvas, 24" x 20", February 4th, 1979, Property of Steve Lohre 
 
Bernie & Ellen, Oil on canvas, 24" x 20", February 11th, 1979, Property of Bernie Block 
 
John Travolta, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", February 18th, 1979, Property of Larry Tee 
 
Peter Frampton, Oil on canvas, 36" x 36", February 25th, 1979, Property of George DuBose
 
Group Show, Axis Gallery, New York, N.Y., Soho 
 
Freeman Family, Oil on canvas, 36" x 48", Property of the Freeman Family
 
Descent of the Female Anima, 48" x 72", March 1st, 1979, Property of John Powell
 
Superman, Oil on Mylar, 6' kite, March 4th, 1979
 
Louise & Cats, Oil on canvas, 48" x 48", April 1st, 1979, Property of Louise Rocquelle
 
Bruce McGowan, Oil on canvas, 16"X 20", 1977, Property of the McGowan Family
Painted in New York City as a commission, Bruce was a fashion designer and he had his own fantasy of life in his home mountains of the Berkshires.

 

United Press International Article, "Master's painting-your face", Cincinnati, Post,8/25/1978 
 
Nude Woman, Copy of Corot, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", April 15th, 1979, Property of Steve Lohre 
Painted on location in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as part of Tom studies. The painting was later giving to Mr. Schaffner of Kentucky by Mrs. Thomas G. Lohre as part payment of her divorce papers. Later Mr. Schaffner put the painting in the trash and his next door neighbor Steve Lohre pick it out of the trash and it was properly identified by Tom as the copy he made in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  

 

Self Portrait, Oil on Mylar, April 22nd, 1979
 
Agi & Vanessa Briely, Oil on canvas, 30" x 30"", May 1st, 1979, Sold to the Briely Family for a Acoustic guitar
 
Rudy the Cat, Oil on canvas, May 1st, 1979
 
Freeman Family, Oil on canvas, May 2nd, 1979
 
Bearsville Cadillac, Oil on board, 14" x 11", May 6th, 1979,
 
Bearsville Pay Phone, Oil on board, May 6th, 1979, Whereabouts unknown
 
Woodstock Stonewall, Oil on board, 14" x 11", May 6th, 1979, Property of the Artist
 
Woodstock Landscape, Oil on board, 10" x 8", May 6th, 1979, Whereabouts unknown
 
Zora Party Mural, Poster paint on paper table cloth, May 13th, 1979, Property of Rasumssen Family 
 
Ann Marie, Oil on canvas, 18" x 24", May 1979, Gradis, Property of Ann Marie Holesek Bianci 
 
Marie Claude Stockl, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", May 15th, 1979, Painted in exchange for a Cocktail reception,
 
Einstein, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", 1979, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Central Park, Oil on canvas, June 12th, 1979
 
Varsha, June 14th, 1979, Rakesh Puri 
 
Duey's Girlfriend, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", June 20th, 1979, Commissioned by Duey Peluso
 
Jim Kinduell, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", July 1st, 1979, Property of Kinduell Family 
 
Peter Saint John & Sister Wendy, Oil on canvas, Oval, July 1st, 1979; painted in Cincinnati 
 
The Who, Oil on canvas, 48" x 36", August 1st, 1979, Stolen 
Took train to Washington; met Patty Gordon on train 
Hiroshima mon Amore, Oil on canvas, 36" x 48", August 8th, 1979, Sold for $800
Painted as a fantasy created by the artist.  
Burni Cohen, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", August 1979, Property of Burni Cohen, painted in Cadiz, Spain 
 
Paris Street October 78 
 
French Still Life October 78 $150 Geneva 
 
Lewandoski 78 Lewandoski $200 
 
Lisa Menelli, Oil on canvas, 48" x 36", September 1st, 1979, Whereabouts unknown 
 
King Kong Panorama, Oil on canvas, 20' x 9', September 2nd, 1979, $650 Whereabouts unknown 
 
Wall, Oil on canvas, September 2nd, 1979, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Susan Chang, September 3rd, 1979, $50 
 
Ian, September 4th, 1979, $30 
 
Pace, September 5th, 1979, $50 
 
John Higginson "Dancer", Oil on canvas, 18" x 24", October 2nd, 1979, $150 
November 23rd, 1979, Ed Hicks recital  
 
Fly to Los Angeles  
 
RW and Tom shared their last dime in NYC, May 11th, 1980  
Fresno Slue, 20" x 16", May 13th, 1980, Property of the Burton Family 
Painted during the hitchhike to Mt. Saint Helens. Tom stopped at his Aunt and Uncles home in Fresno and spent the night. It was only five days later that the mountain exploded.  
Washington Valley, Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", May 14th, 1980, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Mt. St. Helens from West Point Mt., Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", May 16th, 1980, Valued at $900, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Spirit Lake, Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", May 17th, 1980, Valued at $ 900, Whereabouts unknown 
Tom arrived at Chelachie Prairie just two days before the explosion. His last ride was a logger out of Portland. The driver, Dave, made a stop at his bosses house because he wanted a draw on his salary. The column on his car had been broken and he had to hold the steering wheel out straight the whole time to keep the car on the road. He was living in a small three apartment complex just North of the ranger station and East of the Chelachie Prairie quick store. The next day Tom worked on a watercolor of Spirit lake. The next day, Saturday, he planned on working on this watercolor. Tom, Dave and the guys spent the night partying because the next day way off. During the evening he drew a mural on one of the walls in the apartment. The men who made up the loggers were mostly influenced by bike magazines and Playboy. They were a rough group but Tom felt safe with them.  
Mt Saint Helens, Eruption I, From Tum Tum Mt., Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", Noon, May 18th, 1980, Valued at $1,200, Property of the artist 
On Sunday after a night of partying because Sunday was a free day Tom slowly woke up around eight in the morning. Looking outside the sky was cloudy. It was not suppose to be cloudy and after a little thinking everybody realized that the mountain had exploded. Everybody piled into the car and made out for West Point about 27 miles to the South of the exploding Mountain. From that point Tom worked the rest of the day painting four watercolor as fast as he could.  
Mt Saint Helens Eruption II, From Tum Tum Mt., Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", 2:30 pm, May 18th, 1980, Valued at $1,200, Whereabouts unknown 
The mountain plume leveled out during the day.  
Mt. Saint Helens Eruption III, From Tum Tum Mt., Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", 4:30 pm, May 18th, 1980, Valued at $900, Whereabouts unknown 
Painted later during day during the still exploding Volcano.  
Mt. Saint Helens Eruption IV, From Tum Tum Mt., Watercolor on paper, 12" x 9", 7:30 pm, May 18th, 1980, Valued at $900, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Water Cooler, LA 
 
Newspaper Stands, LA, Oil on canvas, 14" x 10", May 1980, Valued at $400 
 
Orange Slices, LA, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", May 1980, Valued at $400 
Show at Burkart the Artist's Gallery, Madison Ave. Covington, Kentucky, "Tom Lohre's Mt. St. Helens Watercolors", July 1980  
 
Jan Thompson, co-anchor on WCPO Magazine story on Tom Lohre's trip to paint Mt. St. Helens, Friday, July 18th 1980  
 
Alan Tucker writer, "Artist Depicts Fury, Beauty of Mt. St. Helens", Kentucky Post 7/23 1980  
 
Saw Dad, January 14th, 1981 in Florida  
 
12 to 30 ... the Mystery Years or the Newer Testament, play performed in Peter Saint John's Backyard, August 9th, 1980

 

The Reapers, Copy from Millet at the CAM, 16" x 20", Valued at $500, Property of Beverly Klyce 
 
Young Woman with Grandmother's Face, Latour Copy from the CAM, 12" x 16", Valued at $900, Property of Susan Lohre 
Painted as a student work working from the original. After completing the dress and background, Tom took the painting to his studio and painted his grandmothers face in place of the young girl. Tom painted his grandmother as a woman of 75. She always liked that particular painting in the Museum.  
Bose Painting Contract, January 1st, 1981 
Flew to LA from Newark, January 17th, 1981  
 
Train ride to Washington, January 21st, 1981, met Patty Gordon  
 
Letter from MOMA, January 23rd, 1981  
 
Carnegie show contract, January 27th, 1981  
 
February 2nd, 1981, check from Lohre & Associates for making coal models  
 
February 5th, 1981, Saturn encounter, Letter received from New York Mayor  
 
March 26th, 1981, Letter from Heavy Metal  
George Chandis, Oil on canvas, 5' x 5', April 2nd, 1981, $1,800, Property of George Chandis Senior 
George was a entrepreneur in Atlanta. He brought Tom down to Atlanta to have him live at his estate while he painted his portrait. Around George are all the things he loved. Even a the painting in the background is a another painting by. Tom lived on the estate of the owner for a month while he completed the work. It was at the time the largest work he had done. Just before arriving he had spend several weeks in Titusville, Florida painting the first space shuttle launch.  
Master Pollack, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", 1981, Property of the Pollack family 
Painted at the same time did was working on a large commission in Atlanta. It was a project that Tom sought to exceed his capabilities. He spend long hours rendering the various aspects of the painting. He attempted to show the little boy in a manner he often could be seen doing.  
Space Shuttle on Launch Pad, Oil on canvas, 24" x 36", April 4th, 1981, Property of Chuck Lohre, Valued at $2,400 
Painted from life under armed guard 200' from the space shuttle.  
Space Shuttle Launch, Oil on canvas, 24" x 36", April 4th, 1981, Whereabouts unknown, Comparable at $900 
 
Kennedy Space Center Press Observation Stands, Oil on canvas, 30" x 24", April 1981, Sold to Coco Beach Electronic Supplier for $800 
 
Show at Carnegie Arts Center, Covington, Kentucky, June 22nd to July 31st, 1981 
Paintings shown: Shuttle on Pad, Shuttle Launch, Hiroshima mon Amour, Descent of the Female Anima, Albert Einstein, Woodstock Landscape, Bearsville Cadillac, John Travolta, Woodstock Wall, Bearsville Pay Phone, Kaku. Owen Findsen, art critic for the Cincinnati Enquirer wrote article called, "Lohre Mixes Art, People and Fantasy" in the June 28th, 1981 issue.  
Sheri Wager, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", July 1981 
 
Paul Seta, Oil on canvas, July 1981 
 
Matt Seta, Oil on canvas, July 1981 
 
Peggy Grace Lohre Buried, July 17th, 1981 
 
Saturn, Oil on canvas, 5' x 5', unfinished, August 28th, 1981
Traveled to JPL with press credentials from WAIF radio.  
Pisces, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", For exchange of lodging during JPL encounter 
May 20th, 1982 Flew from NYC to Cinti  
 
May 27th, 1982 Purchased van from Marty Buckow  
 
Show in Atlanta at Nassau Visions Gallery, May 4th to June 5th 1982, Met Annette Ramsey  
Mitch Fagan 82 
 
Fish 82, Mitch Fagan 
 
Connie Eberhart 
 
Mr. & Mrs. Herb Field, Oil on vinyl, 30" x 24", August 14th, 1982, $800, Tom worked for Field Graphics.
 
Bose Children, Oil on canvas, 30" x 24", August 15th, 1982, Sold for $200 
He took the photographs down on the pier in New York City just below his home there. The flash combined with the sunset started what would be one of his greatest paintings. Even with the children in sweaters and sweat shirts the painting triumphed over all. The manner is quite straightforward using the old master techniques of his master.  
 
September 6th, 1982 court date for speeding Puri to his wedding  
 
September 13th, 1982 started working for RW 
 
December 1st, 1982 Flew to NYC from Palm Beach  
 
February 7th, 1983 met Catie Carney  
Patty Gordon & Family, February 1983, 30" x 40", $675 
March 22nd, 1983 retouched Johnny Mathis's portrait in Hollywood for $250  
 
April 8th, 1983 in Atlanta  
 
April 11th, 1983 First meeting with Father in ten years  
 
April 17th 1983 on the bee line hwy  
 
May 1st, 1983 Painted van in Cincinnati  
Mr. Vaswani, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", May 22nd, 1983, $300, gift to Mr. Vaswani by Mr. Bose 
 
Bear Bryant, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", Sold May 10th, 1983 to Wayne Shaffer for $100
 
Rhett & Todd (Taurus & Aries), 48" x 60", 1983, Property of the artist
Tom painted two such portraits for Rhett. Rhett Fire was a popular man about town in the late 80's. For this painting he choose one of his boy friends and the composition was formed around the astrology signs of the sitters. Later Rhett was one of the first men to contract aids in the city and the painting returned to the artist.  
Mr. & Mrs. Herb Field August 83 $800 
Flew from PB to Atlanta to see Annette  
Mrs. Jane Berning, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", August 2nd, 1983, Property of Jane Berning
Painted during Tom's stay in Palm Beach working for his mentor R_. The work is very much like his masters work. Mrs. Berning lived down the street from Tom when he was a child and he and his brother met them as children when they were flying their model airplanes across the street from their home. While Tom was on the street in Palm Beach he again met the Bernings and that spawned the commission. More because of his famous boss than admiration of Tom. Later he did many paintings for the Bernings and they became major patrons.  
 
In the painting Tom included a large broach, in the manner of his mentor, that Mrs. Berning did not own. They make the joke that the second wife will be looking for the broach! The statue in the painting is part of the famous fountain in downtown Cincinnati. This painting is a excellent example of a mix between Tom's style and his mentors, "R_."  
 
Paid with check August 2nd, 1983.  
 
Living with Catie Carney, August 18th, 1983  
Master Colin McIntosh, 24" x 30", Oil on canvas, Fall 1983, Property of McIntosh Estate 
Painted while Tom was finishing R_. Tom met the McIntosh Family while working as the artist in residence for the James Hunt Barker Galleries of Palm Beach, New York and Nantucket.  
Mrs. Charlie Jewtraw, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", August 31st & September 6th 1983 $50 check, $100 check December 14th,1983 
Flew to NYC and back September 18th, 1983  
 
Had booth space in Boca Raton, October 10th, 1983. Worked on changing Solomon painting.  
Mr. King, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", October 20th, 1983 
 
Miya & Stephen Lassiter Commission, November 25th, 1983, $50 
May 12th, 1984 brother Chuck gets married  
Chuck & Janet's portrait, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", Property of Lohre Family 
Jupiter Art Class, Hobe Sound, Florida set up by Jimmy Barker Gallery, $100 check, January 16th, 1984  
 
Arrived in Nantucket helping Barker Gallery 
 
Check from Catherine Greeff for $125, August 9th, 1984  
 
Show at Barker Gallery in Nantucket, August 18th, 1984  
 
Spent Fall in NYC, went to Florida for third season.  
McIntosh Family, Oil on canvas, 48" x 48", Winter 1985, Property of McIntosh Family 
Painted in a formal manner while staying in their guest house on their Palm Beach Estate. Tom spent a lot of time playing with their middle son Hunter. The family made themselves available to him and he worked continually until the work was done. Being that the beach was just down the road they sought that area as a staging for the painting. Tom would bring in various pieces of the foliage into the studio to paint from. The clothes were put on a dummy he made out of chicken wire. Since then he has made models out of chicken wire quite often.  
Michael McIntosh, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30", Spring 1985, Property of the McIntosh Family
 
Soothsayer 85 
 
Robert Isler's Mother April 85 16X20 $150 
Flew to Palm Beach to drive Barker truck to Nantucket, May 1st, 1985  
Wateau Copy, Charcoal on paper, 8" x 10", May 6th, 1985, Property of Ortiz Aquilar, who later took him on a trip to Puerto Rico 
 
Miss Polan, Oil on canvas, 36" x 24", May 17th, 1985 
Second Summer in Nantucket, June 6th, 1985.  
Margaret with Son in Winslow Homer's Breezing Up, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", August 8th, 1985, Property of Margaret Battle and Dick Scaife 
 
Reverse Still Life, Oil on Mylar, 12" x 16", Painted in NYC, Sold to Chuck Lohre at auction for $12 
 
Flowers with clear squat round glass vase with corner of table in lower right hand corner, Latour copy, Painted in Nantucket, Oil on Mylar, 16" x 12", Property of Susan Lohre 
 
Jeep, Started in Nantucket and finished in Cincinnati, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16"", September 5th, 1985, Property of Steve Lohre 
Tom wanted to duplicate the great men in a row boat paintings in a modern way. He chose a Jeep and painted it riding the dunes like a boat. Later he painted his brother riding in it. He painted it in the Fall in Nantucket after all the tourists had left. It was his second year of artist in residence for Tom at the James Hunt barker Galleries.  
Nuttle Family 85 Philip Nuttle 
 
Ferry 85 Philip Nuttle 
 
Eastern Shore Lunch 85 Chris 
 
Brook Shields, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", 1985, Property of the artist, Valued at $200 
 
Brook Shields Reverse Color 85 
 
Da Vinci's Brook Shields 85 
 
Nantucket Still Life, Oil on canvas, 1985 
 
Nantucket Breakfast 85 Cindy List 
 
Nantucket Breakfast II, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1985, Property of Chuck Lohre 
One of a series of still life paintings done in his attic bedroom in the James Hunt Barker Gallery in Nantucket. This was Tom's first Summer in Nantucket and he spent his day running the gallery and painting at night. He had done some similar very successful still life's in Europe and this series look a lot like those. He painted on white canvas that had been painted with a colored varnish of polyurethane. It gives the paintings a very old look.  
Seven Mile Road Nantucket, Oil on canvas, 1985 Nantucket, Carl Bankemper 
 
Nantucket Loves Liberty on Widow's Walk, Silkscreen on glass, 12" x 16", Spring 1985, Edition of 20 
 
Nantucket Loves Liberty in Harbor, Silkscreen on glass, 12" x 16", Spring 1985, Edition of 20 
 
Man Leaning in Boat, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1984 Nantucket, Owner unknown 
 
George Rowing in Boat, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1984 Nantucket, Property of Patty Wilson, NYC 
 
Captain Eagle's Pond. Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1984 Nantucket, Property of Susan Lohre, Valued at $1,200 
Painted as a redention of past masterpieces. Tom would select a old master painting and then find a place in Nantucket where he could paint a new scene using the old composition and color.  
Nantucket Farm, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1985 Nantucket, Owner unknown 
 
Painted Cement Doggie, Oil on cement, Fall 1985, Property of Antique Store, Nantucket  
 
Mary Lohre, Oil on canvas, 24" x 3", Property of the artist 
Painted while Mary was working at the Devou Golf Course next to her home. It shows her on the balcony serving lunch.  
 
First art auction in St. Louis, November 28th, 1985, having flown from NYC with a stack of paintings for Thanksgiving 
 
Drove through a snow storm on Christmas eve from NYC to Cincinnati. Brought air pressure pallet and learned of the Uranus encounter while at the Observatory.  
 
Valley Forge  to paint the Conger Wedding Couple
The Gaunlet, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 16" x 126", Fall 1985, Property of the artist, Valued at $200 
January 20th, 1986 driving from Palm Beach to NYC.  
 
Uranus encounter January 21st, 1986, stayed with Patty Gordon. Developed portable air pressure pallet.  
"Painting model of Voyager 2", 1986, Los Angeles Times, Photograph by Penni Gladstone 
 
Voyager II over Uranus with Moons, Oil on canvas using auto pallet, 20" x 16", 1986, Property of Chuck Lohre, Valued at $750 
 
Voyager II over Uranus at Miranda, Oil on canvas using auto pallet, 20" x 16", 1986, Property of Chuck Lohre 
 
Voyager II over Uranus, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 8" x 10"", 1986, Property of Chuck Lohre for $16 at auction 
 
Voyager II at Uranus with Nude Couple Playing Record, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 16" x 12", 1986, Property of the artists, Valued at $300 
 
Kris's Cat, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 8" x 10", Valued at $300, Property of Kris Wolf 
Tom traveled to San Francisco and stayed with Kris Wolf after the Uranus encounter. There he painted her cat.  
Canyon, Oil on canvas, 36" x 24", Property of Pat & Jim Stafford 
This is a painting that Tom's grandmother started and Tom finished while he was visiting his Aunt and Uncle in Grand Junction.  
Pet Cemetary Illustration, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", Whereabouts unknown 
While staying with Chuck Lohre on McMillian while in Cincinnati in the Spring, Tom received a commission to copy the cover of a Steven King Novel.  
Berning Garden, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 16" x 12", Valued at $750, Property of Berning Family 
 
Uranus and USS Enterprise, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 20" x 16", Valued at $300, Sold to Tom Hawkins at auction for $21 
 
Saturn with Moon, Oil on canvas. 10" x 8", 1992, Spring 1986, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Uranus, USS Enterprise & Kincon Warbird, Oil on canvas using auto palette, 8" x 10", Spring 1986, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
Begining of 4th season in Palm Beach, January 31st, 1986.  
 
Drove from Cincinnati to Palm Beach, March 10th, 1986 to drive van to Nantucket.  
Off Shore boat, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 24" x 20", Winter 1986, Property of Steve Lohre 
Painted with Tom's painting machine during his last Winter in Palm Beach as artist in residence for the James Hunt Barker Galleries. Tom spent the Winter studying and painting the ocean from the boardwalk of Palm Beach. Mostly he painted the waves crashing on the beach but this time he painted a sailboat that sometimes would the shore.  
Drug Dealer Off Florida, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 20" x 16", Winter 1986, Property of Larry of Atlanta 
Painted as a drug deal gone bad at sea with the blue light of the DEA helicopter shining down.  
Catie In Chair, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 20" x 16", Winter 1986, Property of the artist, painted in a hotel room during one of Tom's visits to Palm Beach.  
 
Drove Barker truck to Nantucket, April 1st, 1986. Later flew from NYC to Palm Beach to pick up van. Then drove to Marathon to see Dad, May 15th, 1986. Started 3rd season in Nantucket on June 6th, 1986; Pacific Club dues expire on June 30th and 5th season in Palm Beach on January 1st, 1987  
Chester's Home Party, Unfinished, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 24" x 20", August 9th, 1986, Property of the artist 
 
Kentucky, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 24" x 20", August 10th, 1986, Sold to Rick Guakel at auction for $15 
 
Kentucky, Oil on canvas using spider palette, 24" x 20", August 11th, 1986, Property of the artist
 
Lohre Home, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", January 19th, 1987, Property of the artist
Painted as a example of his new found impressionistic style.  
Greg Herthel, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", Valued at $2,400, Property of Linda Brown 
 
Rick Herthel, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", Valued at $2,400, Property of Linda Brown 
 
Boothe Portrait, Second version worked on 
 
Main Straus Fountain II, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", January 21st, 1987, Property of Chuck Lohre for $20 
 
Covington Tower, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", January 21st, 1987, Valued at $300, Sold to Chuck Lohre at auction for $10 
 The weather was too cold to paint outside which prompted me to paint from photographs.  I had painted many scenes of Cincinnati and wanted to explore Kentucky.  I had painted a very par.:)Popular scene in Nantucket over and over again, and wanted to find just such a scene for Covington.  In Cincinnati, "Fountain Square" fills my qualifications of a very popular & successfully image to be painted.  In fact, I recommend students paint the Fountain at the Fountain, sell the work there and work on improving their skills while on the job'.  
Fancy Grocery Store, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Winter 1987, Property of the artist, Valued at $650 
One winter in New York before going to Florida, I painted a series of works from inside various shops in the West Village.  It was too cold to work outside.  One such work is "Village Fancy Groceries."  
Uncle Jerry Lohre, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", February 10th, 1987, Property of Steve Lohre, Valued at $750 
Uncle Jerry, he was still living in the home he had built.  
 
Traveled to Palm Beach stopping at Chester Salisbury's  
Kim Sargent Painting the Town Palm Beach Daily 3/25 1987 
 
Breakers Hotel, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", March 1987, Property of Randy Lohre 
 
Breakers Hotel I, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", March 1887, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Breakers Hotel II, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", March 1887, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Breakers Hotel III, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", March 1887, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Sloppy Joe's I, Oil on canvas, March 25th, 1987, Property of Chuck Lohre 
This is Mr. Lohre's best small impressionistic oil done on location. For many years Tom painted everyday on location. This painting is the culmination of that experience. He started because he wanted to learn and he left it because he had learned all that he could, outside. Now he paints in a combined manner of outside in the beginning and in the studio to finish, not allowing the weather or the time needed to interfere with producing the best possible work.  
 
The stippled surface was on the orginal was caused by placing the painting against a bank of cocktail straws. Some of the paint went into the straws and he used that paint to produce several duplicates. At the time , he was experimenting with duplicating oil paintings. One such experiment was to load a bank of of cocktail straws with paint and then squeeze them onto mutiple canvases. The problem was that even a 8 x 10 inch canvas had hundreds of straws and he could not develope a way of squeezing out an exact amount. For many years Tom experimented in many various ways but in the end he gave up all experimenting because it was not a major part of his talent. To reproduce it would be a violation of his talent.  
Sloppy Joe's II, Oil on canvas, March 25th, 1987, Property of Anette Ramsey 
 
Sloppy Joe's III, Oil on canvas, March 25th, 1987, Property of the artist 
 
Sloppy Joe's IV, Oil on canvas, March 25th, 1987, Property of the artist 
This series of paintings are Tom's best small impressionistic oil done on location.  Placing the painting against a bank of cocktail straws caused the stippled surface.  Some of the paint went into the straws and I used that paint to produce several duplicates.  At the time, I was experimenting with duplicating oil paintings.  One such experiment was to load a bank of cocktail straws with paint and then squeeze them onto multiple canvases.  The problem was that even a E3 X 10 inch canvas had hundreds of straws and I could not load them all before the paint dried' Also I could not develop a way of squeezing out an exact amount.  
Coney Island, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", Spring, 1987, Valued at $900, Sold to Chuck Lohre at auction for $30 
 
Observatory, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Spring, 1987, $600, Property of Chuck Lohre 
This painting was done from life in the fall of 1987 after my return from a summer of painting in Nantucket.  There, I had great success-with this style of outdoor painting.  The canvas is created in one day.  I start with stretching the canvas and deciding the composition the night before.  Most of the times I start around noon, find a spot, set up and paint till about five O’clock, larger canvases might take more than one day.  The more I work in this manner the more I feel that time spent is less and less important.  I want to complete the best possible work.  The overriding constraint is that the surface must appear flawless which means it has to be done in one motion.  These days I put paintings in the freezer to maintain that surface quality.  
Overlook, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Spring, 1987, Property of Chuck Lohre for $30 
 
Licking River, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Spring, 1987, Property of Mary Lohre for $7 
 
Covington, Kentucky's Suspension Bridge, Oil on canvas, 36"X 24", Spring 1987, Property of the Brown Family; Valued at $3,600 
The painting is a long view of the famous suspension bridge between Covington, Kentucky and Cincinnati, Ohio, built by John Robeling in 1860 as scene from Cincinnati. To the left you can see, across the river, the floating restaurant Mike Finks's looking like a working sternwheeler. Just above the steamboat are the two stone homes that John Robeling built for himself and his engineer. Just to the right of the homes is a modern home owned by Lawyer, Pat Flannery.  
 
Tom set up his canvas on the Ohio side of the river for two weeks to get this painting. He was right below where the bums hung out but never actually talked with them. Since completion, this part of the river bank has been cleared and a landing for a party boat has been erected. Across the river is the "Mike Fink's" where Tom worked as a boy swabbing the deck and emptying the trash for the restaurant. The two buildings in yellow gray stone were built for John Robeling and his engineer when he was building the Suspension Bridge. Tom painted this canvas as a commission for Linda Brown. She had always wanted a painting of the bridge during the day and the night. Tom just recently finished a night scene of the bridge for her, using "Tall Stacks" 1995 for a backdrop.  
Mike Fink's, Oil on canvas, 4' x 3', Spring 1987, Sold to Annalisa for $75 
 
Nantucket Main Street, 20" x 16", August 20th, 1987, Property of the Artist, Valued at $900 
This painting was done during his second season of Main Street painting in Nantucket. He really used the street to learn. He discovered the tunnel vision composition needed to create a successful painting. In the beginning he would sell them for low prices and slowly learned on the job. Up to that point he was painting studio oils and found that he could not go through enough ideas fast enough to learn nor sell enough to justify the time. Using a four color palette, he was able to focus his attention on color. He had four tubes screwed into a small palette and would squeeze out just what he needed. He used three colors that approximated process colors and white. Later he learned that at least the basic colors: alizarin crimson, bright red, windsor yellow, windsor blue, ultramarine blue and windsor violet in the Windsor Newton line of colors are needed to mix a complete pallette. He looks forward to mixing color chemically whenever possible and avoid mixing color on the palette  
Main Street Nantucket, 24"X 20", Summer 1987, Property of the Artist, Valued at $2,400 
After a stint at working for his mentor in Palm Beach, Tom started his circuit from Palm Beach in the Winter to Nantucket in the Summer. After three years of trying to find himself, he mastered the "en plein air" painting style of painting. To prefect his coloring and composition he painted on the street everyday finishing a canvas a day of the famous fountain on Main Street. This view was what he considered the best and ten days on this canvas. He was lucky no one purchased this example. Out of the over three hundred canvases done over three years of daily painting he would not sell this one. He feels that the colors are those of death and that is the reason it did not sell. He still considers it the best view the island has to offer.  
Washington Square Arch Fall 87 
 
Village Cigars Fall 87 Artist 
 
Seventh Ave & Christopher Street, Oil on canvas, 24" x 20", September 6th, 1987, Property of the artist, Valued at $2,400 
Painted after Tom 's best Summer of "en plien air" painting in Nantucket. He would go on to paint similar scenes and styles wherever he would visit for the next several months. The coloring and brush stroke would leave him in a year and he would never paint that way again.  
7th Avenue News Stand, Oil on canvas, Fall 87, Property of Chuck Lohre 
 
MacDougal & Bleecker, Fall 1987 night Buckow 
 
Hurricane Gloria, Fall 1987 Stockl 
 
Father Demos Square 87 Sullivan 
 
Washington Square 87 Sullivan 
 
Aunt Annie, Oil on canvas, 1987, Property of Patty Meyers 
One Winter when Tom was between Palm Beach and New York he decided that he was going to paint his oldest relatives, Jerry and Cresenttia Lohre.He started with Cresentia because she was in a nursing home. All the time he would see he she would ask how much it cost?  
Palm Beach Hibiscus, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1987, Property of Steven Lohre 
Painted in the side yard of the McIntosh Estate while Tom was painting the family portrait  
Palm Beach I, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, Valued at $200, Sold to Paul Seta at auction for $10 
Painted as a experiment in multiples. Tom arranged 12 canvases in a gang and painted them all on the beach on day, with photo by Gary George.  
Palm Beach II, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, Valued at $200, Sold to Mary Jo Hammons at auction for $7.50 
 
Palm Beach III, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach IV, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach V, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach VI, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach VII, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach VIII, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach IX, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach X, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach XI, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Palm Beach XII, 12 identical scenes, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, 
 
Caulking Gun Paint Dispenser 
I have a hobby of working on a painting robot.  The machine has progressed slowly owing to the fact that many subsystems have to be resolved.  Currently I have developed a point and squeeze system.  Ultimately I would like to have a system that uses brushes much like a human does.  
Via Palm Beach, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, Property of Michelle St. Clair for $5 
 
Palm Beach Overgrowth, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", Property of Chuck Lohre for $20 
 
Mary Lohre, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", 1987, Property of the artist 
Painted as the first camera obscure experiment and with his automatic palette.  
Yuso Hase, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1987, Property of Yuso Hase 
The second of the camera obscure portraits.  
 
1987 Gross Income $12,020 Net Income $-356  
Cows in a Field in Palm Beach County, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", March 1st, 1988, Valued at $750, Property of Michael McClintock estate 
 
Jim Beam Stakes in Kentucky, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", May 15th, 1988 
 
Tree on Liberty Street in Pittsburgh, Oil on canvas, 10" x 12", May 22nd, 1988, Valued at $300, Property of Michael Hahalyak, Met Mike in Palm Beach 
 
Block House, Pittsburgh, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", May 23rd,1988, Valued at $750, Whereabouts unknow 
 
Pittsburgh Incline, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", May 24th, 1988, Valued at $750, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Duquesne Club, Pittsburgh, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", May 25th, 1988, Valued at $750, Whereabouts unknown 
Fourth season in Nantucket, May 31st, 1988  
Pig Festival with Two Boys Along Fence, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", June 1st, 1988, Valued at $200, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Pig Festival with Woman and Girl Along Fence, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", June 1st, 1988, Valued at $200, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Pig Festival with Man with Top Hat, Unfinished, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", June 1st, 1988, Valued at $200, Property of the artist 
 
Two Kids Playing Along Straight Warf, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", June 2nd, 1988, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknow 
 
Two Kids Along the Beach, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", June 3rd, 1988, Valued at $300, Whereaouts unknown 
 
Woman and Child on Union Street, Oil on canvas, June 4th, 1988, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Old Rat's Warf Club, Oil on canvas, June 5th, 1988, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Mr. Anapol in Model T, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", Valued at $750, August 1st, 1988, Property of Anapol Family 
 
Mrs. Milburn, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", Worked on August 2nd, 1988, Valued at $7,000, Property of Milburn Family 
 
Claudia Holdgate and Daughter Portrait on Main Street, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", August 3rd, 1988, Valued at $750, Property of Holgate Family 
 
Painted Dalmation, Oil on concrete, August 4th, 1988, Porperty of the Hosea Autiques 
 
Mic Ronson's Woodstock Home, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", August 30th, 1988, Valued at $750, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Chester Salisbury Parents, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", Corrected August 31st, 1988, Valued at $1000, Property of the Salisbury Family 
 
Woman Walking Dog on Bedford Street, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", September 1st, 1988, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Village Cigars with Woman and Black Man, Oil on canvas, September 2nd, 1988, Wherabouts unknow 
 
Sheridan Square with Four People on left, Oil on canvas, September 3rd, 1988, Whereabouts unknow 
 
Village Vangard, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", October 10th, 1988, Valued at $750, Whereabouts unknow 
 
Maeand, Silkscreen on paper, Winter 1988, $60, Plates produced in the computer, Print used for a invitation of a art auction 
 
Mt. Adams I, Oil on canvas, Winter 1988, Property of Beverly Klyce, Comparable at $750 
Painted from life on the waterfront during Febuary.  
Mt. Adams II, Oil on canvas, Winter 1988, Owner Unknown, Comparable at $750 
Painted from life on the waterfront during Febuary.  
Mt. Adams III, Oil on canvas, Winter 1988, Owner Unknown, Comparable at $750 
Painted from life on the waterfront during Febuary.  
Mt. Adams IV, Oil on canvas, Winter 1988, Owner Unknown, Comparable at $750 
Painted from life on the waterfront during Febuary.  
Boomer Easion, Silkscreen on paper, 1988, Limited edition, Valued at $75, #1 owned by Paul Seta, 
Produced for the Bengals attempt to the Super Bowl. This was the first silk screen print done by Tom in many years. He was given artist in residence at Kinduell Screen Products, the same company he worked for while in college.  
Sloppy Joe's, Silkscreen on paper, 1988, 
 
Tailgate Party, Silkscreen on paper, 1988 
 
Southernmost House, Key West, Silkscreen on paper, Edition of 35, 1988, Valued at $250 with gold leaf frame 
#14 Sold to Annalisa at auction for $5.  
Mount Adams, Silkscreen on paper, 1988, edition of 50 
Printed in three prinary colors using a novel plate making technique. Using several tints of small oval rubber stamps the plates were formed by stamping the various tints. Once combine on the paper the colors made a full spectrum of color. Tom's previous paintings of Mt. Adams were done in the middle of Winter and he used that color scheme for this print.  
Marilyn Monroe, Silkscreen on paper, 1988, edition of 50, 24" x 36", Framed for $250 
This was Tom's first attempt at getting a likeness in silk screen. The technique is one of making the plate by stamping various tinted rubber stamps on a sheet of acetate for each of three colors. A black line plate was drawn with a litho pencil and ganged up with each color to make the black line. The image was collected from various sources. Tom was looking to show Marilyn as a drug dependant person using the Channel perfume bottle as a substitute for a pint bottle of whiskey.  
 
#35 Sold to David, sold auction for $5  
#46 Sold to Annalisa at auction for $5  
Nantucket Fountain & Telephone Building, 8" x 10", 1988 
Painted during the beginning of Tom's third year of painting during the Summer in Nantucket. He moved from living upstairs the Barker Gallery to living with Mrs. James Barker, no relation. Originally it was painted on a gesso coated t-shirt but when he wore it to the gallery opening it caused such a embarrassment he cut it out and stretched it on stretchers.  
Doris's Sister and Her Child, Oil on canvas, 20" x 24", 1988, Property of Michael Musto 
Started in the Spring of 1989 while Tom was making a short visit to Nantucket. He was so taken with meeting them on the street that he took their photograph and later painted it in Cincinnati. He spent all Summer painting in Cincinnati and shipping the paintings to Nantucket for inclusion in the Artists Association's showings.  
Nantucket Fountain with two girls and one boy, Oil on canvas, 9" x 12", 1988, Property of the artist, Valued at $400 
22 Oil Paintings  
$3,800 11/18/88 Oil on Canvas for Michael Hahalyak  
   
Bedford Street Fall 88 
 
Commerce Street Winter 88 
 
Cherry Lane Theater 87 Spring 
 
South Bleecker from Christopher 88 Gilman 
 
Christopher & Bleecker 88 
 
Deauville Groceries, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1988, Sold to Tim Kinduell at auction for $7.50 
 
Penningcamp Park, Key Largo, Fl. 88, 20 x 16, Oil on canvas, Property of Carol Gunter 
Painted in Marathon, Florida. The statue of Christ is the main feature of a underwater park off the coast of Florida. The site is a popular diving spot. The artist used various photos to compose the scene. He tried to make the dive but the weather was not favorable. He discovered that female beauty is not all that noticeable when the diving gear including the b-c vest is on. That is why the girl in the painting does not wear one. This is one of two underwater paintings done by the artist. The technique is of the heavy impasto method that he used during the years of 1985 to 89.  
Underwater Shipwreck 88, 20 x 16, Oil on canvas, Property of Randy Lohre 
 
Fort Martello, Florida 88, 24" x 20, Oil on canvas, Sold to Japanese from the Gingerbread Gallery in Key West Florida 
 
Tree in Key West 88, 10 x 8, Oil on canvas, Sold out of the Gingerbread Gallery in Key West Florida 
 
22 Paintings for Michael Hahalyak, November ,1988, $3,800 
In the Fall of 1988 Tom gave up the circuit of Palm Beach Nantucket to stay at his family home to repair it and to keep it from being sold. He was going to be spending quite awhile at the family home in Park Hills, Kentucky, living with his brother and sister plus a roomer or two.  
 
List of paintings: Cherry Lane Theatre, Father Demos Square, Tailgate Party, Tall Stacks I, Nantucket Main Street, Zero Main Street,  
Chi Chi Hut I, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1988, Property of Paul Seta for $5 at auction 
During this stint in Palm Beach Tom believed that this was the scene that depicted what this part of Florida meant to Tom. He worked on several canvases over the next several weeks. He stayed with Paul McMullen.  
Chi Chi Hut II, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1988 
 
Chi Chi Hut III, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1988, Property of Dr. Haas 
 
Chi Chi Hut IV, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1988, 
 
14 Sloppy Joe's, identical, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", 1988, 
#1 sold to Dana at auction for $1  
 
1988 Gross Income $15,077 Net Income $144  
Tony Milburn's Home, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", January, 1989 
One of the first paintings done while Tom had moved to his family home in order to keep it in the family.  
Fort Thomas Home, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1989, Valued at $1000, Property of Burton Family 
 
New Building on Water Street Nantucket, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", April 1st, 1989, Property of buider 
 
 
Dafoldi in Sconset, Oil on canvas, 20" x 24", April 2nd, 1989, Valued at $750, Porperty of the artist 
 
Daffodil, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", April 3rd, 1989, Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Brant's Band, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", April 16th, 1989, Valued at $300, Property of Ronda Granger 
 
Washington Square, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30", April 17th, 1989, Valued at $2,400, Property of Mark Sulliavn 
 
87th Street, Oil on canvas, 10" x 20", April 18th, 1989, Valued at $500, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Washington Square Arch, oil on canvas, 20" x 16", April 19th, 1989, Valued at $1000, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Village Cigars, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", April 20th, 1989, Valued at $1000, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Waverly Theatre, Oil on canvas, 24" x 20", April 21, 1989, Valued at $1000, Property of Ronda Granger 
 
Greenwich, Conn., Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", April 22nd, 1989, Valued at $1000, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Fifth Avenue, Oil on canvas, April 23rd, 1989, Wherabouts unknown 
 
Rivera, Oil on canvas, April 24th, 1989, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Father Demos Square, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", April 25th, 1989, Valued at $1000, Sold the same day to a girl for a wedding present for $75 
 
Harbor Scene Nantucket, Oil on canvas, 24" x 20", May 14th, 1989, Valued at $750, Property of Cindy List 
 
Girl in the Fountain, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", 1989, Property of Dick Foster; Comparable at $1,000 
Expanding his impressionistic style developed in 1987, Tom combined impressionistic paint surface background with a fine smooth surface academic style for the figure he had learn from his master.  
Nantucket Main Street with Ship on Zero Main Street, Oil on canvas, May 15th, 1989, Whereabouts unknown 
Traveled to East Hampton for end of Summer sail, while cousin and friends spent the week in NYC apartment. Traveled home with them to Atlanta with them dropping me off North of Atlanta at Mary Moon's Camp. Stayed in Atlanta for awhile and then brought Mary Moon to Cincinnati for her to recouperate from her soured relationship.  
Covington Landing, Oil on canvas, 30"X 24", 1989, Valued at $5,600, Property of Dick Foster 
This was the first canvas Tom worked on where he wanted to duplicate the great landscapes of the past. He set up on location and worked a few hours everyday for a month to produce this result. He learned that the composition should not be dependant on where you can set up. In the future he used the composition plastically, painting a form that worked in the canvas area independent on whether you could actually see the scene or not.  
 
The view itself is a modern cache of riverboats not unlike those of old. Tom worked on the river for his first job and has every since had a love affair with the lore of the river.  
 
Photographed Betsy LaSorella for model 8" x 10", January 6th, 1990.  
Neptune with spot, Oil on canvas, 8" x 10", Property of Dick Foster, Valued at $450 
 
Conservatory, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", Valued at $300, Whereabouts unknown 
 
Two Girls, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1990, Valued at $500, sold to Peggy Groeber at auction for $10 
 
Sankety Head, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1990, 1990, Valued at $1,200, Sold to Randy Lohre at auction for $18 
 
Three Girls, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1990, Valued at $900, Sold to Maloney at auction for $20 
 
Little Girl with Bouquet, 16" x 20", Oil on canvas, 1990, Valued at $500, Sold to Dana James at auction for $5 
 
Girl at the Nantucket Fountain, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", Valued at $900, Sold to Randy Lohre at auction for $20 
 
CAM Copy, Oil on canvas, Oil on canvas, Sold to Pete McCann at auction 
 
White Horse Tavern 90 
 
Earth Still Life, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", New York Earth Day 1990, Property of Beverly Klyce, Valued at $600 
 
Kershaw Home, 16"X12", Oil on canvas, Spring 1990, Valued at $750 with frame, Property of Mark Sullivan 
Painted during Tom artists in residence in Greenville, South Carolina. The Kershaw Home was the boy hood home of one of the gentlemen on the estate. He told the story of his father buying his brother and him a old single engine airplane and placing it wings off in the back yard.  
 
The home now is owned by another family and his mother lived right around the corner. The home being in a rather remote part of South Carolina did not appeal to the children of the homestead.  
Greenville Home, 10" x 8", 1990, Beverly Klyce 
 
Foster Home, 10" x 8", 1990, Beverly Klyce 
Flew to Europe July 9th, 1990, returned August 16th, 1990.  
Beverly in Monte Carlo, 30" x 40", 1990 Beverly Klyce 
 
Carol in Monte Carlo, 30" x 40", 1990, Gunter 
 
Street scene Monte Carlo, 8" x 10", 1990, Beverly Klyce 
 
Chateau Pome, 10" x 8", 1990, Dominic Dreyfus, painted from life while staying with the Dreyfus' 
 
French Still Life, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", 1990, Property of Beverly Klyce 
 
French Farm, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1990, Property of Beverly Klyce, Valued at $1000 
Drove to NYC from Cincinnati to deliver painting to Mark Sullivan, November 15th, 1990 
 
Cocktail party in NYC, December 8th, 1990 
 
Drove to Greenville from NYC, December 11th, 1990 
 
Cocktail Party House Warming Party at Greenville Home, December, 1990  
Meyers Portrait, Oil on canvas, 36" x 48", December 22nd, 1990 
Drive to St. Louis, December 30th, 1990  
 
Drove to Chicago from Cincinnati with sister Cindy, December 31st, 1990. Drove off road on a ice slick and spent the night in Palmer House. Spent the day studing Santa Claus paintings at the Chicago Science Museum  
Law Office 90 Beverly Klyce 
1990 Gross Income $15,614 Net Income $6,6136  
Fancy, Oil on canvas, 12"X 16", Febuary 14th, 1991, Property of Dick Foster; Comparable at $750 
Tom gave this painting to Dick Foster for Valentines. Although Tom had been living at the Foster estate for a year painting various commissions for him he liked this one the best.  
Unitarian Church, Oil on canvas, 30" x 24", Febuary 19th, 1991, Dick Foster's gift to church 
 
Dick Foster, Oil on canvas, 30"X 40", 1991, Property of Dick Foster; Comparable at $9,000 
Painted as a return to the very fine detailed work Tom was known for in the beginning of his career. He was quite taken with the manner of the subject, sometimes comparing him to Caesar. Mr. Foster was a lawyer that worked for people who had lost all or most of what they had because of the negligence of others, mostly large paper mills well know in the area of Greenville South Carolina where Mr. Foster lived. Dick did make a run at public office but eventually got out of it because it did not offer the truth and honesty he touted.  
 
In this portrait Tom combined youthful exuberance with the Dick Foster he had come to know. Dick had been a avid golfer and tennis player and though he did teach golf to Tom, Dick was just not a tennis player anymore. Tom carefully rendered this portrait for a great man he had come to know and love.  
Irene in a Cotton Field, Oil on canvas, 16"X 12", 1991, Valued at $1,200, Property of Dick Foster 
While working for Mr. Foster in Greenville, South Carolina, Tom was asked to paint this view of his wife in a cotton field because it reminded one of Dick closest friends of their childhood growing up in the cotton fields of Memphis, Tennessee.  
 
Drove to Cincinnati from Greenville, March 10th, 1991  
 
Drove to Kershaw from Greenville, April 1st, 1991.  
 
Drove to Key West from Hilton Head, April 19th, 1991.  
 
Drove to Coconut Grove from Key West, April 29th, 1991.  
 
Drove to Greenville from Miami, May 6th, 1991  
 
Drove to Cincinnati from Greenville, May 5th, 1991  
 
Drove to St. Louis, May 11th, 1991  
 
Working on world decal, May 22nd, 1991  
 
Working on Big House Fence, May 22nd, 1991  
Fountain Square, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", Property of Annie Milburn 
Article for Noveau Magazine, June 7th, 1991  
 
Visited Ronda in Woodstock, June 18th, 1991  
Albert Crudo, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", June 20th, 1991, Property of Albert Crudo 
Drove to 3 Mile Harbor from NYC, June 20th, 1991.  
 
Drove to Greenville from NYC, July 1st, 1991  
 
Apprentice Michael Gowan assisted on, July 26th, 1991.  
 
Drove to Cincinnati from Greenville, August 13th, 1991.  
 
Sailed with Irene to Maine, August 20th, 1991.  
Patrick Boys, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", September 19th, 1990, Property of Patrick Family 
Purchased motorcycle, November 6th, 1991.  
Reedy Bridge, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", November, 26th, 1991, Valued at $750, Property of Foster Family 
Drove to Lexington from Cincinnati, January 1992.  
 
Drove to Greenville from Lexington, January 6th, 1992.  
 
Flew to the Bahamas, April 6th, 1992 with Irene Moore and Clarie Logan 
 
1991 Gross Income $16,906; Net Income $2,983  
Yale University, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1992, Property of Bruce Foster 
Tom painted the campus of Yale while on a road trip. He had to have a new transmission put into his car and while it was being done he had the mechanic drop him off at the campus. He spend the whole day working and was picked up in his newly repaired car and then set off South towards New York City. He later sold the painting to a alumni of the school for about the price of the transmission.  
Row Houses on McDougal Street, Ink Pen on paper, 7" x 5", Summer 1992 
Painted as a example for client.  
Seaport , Watercolor on paper, 7" x 5", Summer 1992, One of several 
Painted as preliminary sketch for a large oil painting  
Grand Casino, Pencil on paper, 10" x 8", Summer 1992, Property of the artist 
 
Winning at the Craps Table, 10" x 8", Pencil on paper, Summer 1992, Property of the artist 
 
Delta Queen, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", 1992, Property of Jim & Bev Acree 
Painted as preliminary studio work for a 40" x 30" piece. He worked from a photo that he took at the first Tall Stacks Festival in Cincinnati. He completed one impressionistic work from that photo and his sister liked it so much that she commissioned a larger work. Sometimes a single image can capture the imagination like nothing else.  
Bennington College, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", Summer 1992, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
Painted as one of a series of colleges. He was in New England visiting a friend when he was taken with the vast view from the grounds of the college. It was the beginning of a more detailed style of small paintings that illustrated Tom desire to paint ing a very refined old style of manner. The manner mostly means that the sky is large and the landscape is small and dark.  
Showboat Majestic, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", October 15th, 1992, Valued at $300, Property of Thomas Werner MD 
Originally started from life at the 2nd Tall Stacks Celebration along the waterfront of Cincinnati. The weekend was wet and for the most part Tom sat in the rain painting. The wind was blowing so hard he had to hold the easel with one hand and since it was raining he had to hold both the easel and the umbrella with his free hand. He painted a good while with the water running down through his shoes. He recently finished the work for Dr. Keys. Dr. Keys is donating the painting to the 1997 Alizhimer's Gala Silent Auction.  
 
Tom worked on the showboat when it was first docked in Cincinnati. John Beatty allowed the showboat to moor behind his string of barges that attached to Captain Hooks restaurant. Captain Hooks was the first floating converted riverboat restaurant on the Ohio side of the river. Tom worked there while in high school. He jobs were to pump out the water in the holds, wash the decks, tend to the moorings and matain the engines that supplied the power for the marina.  
 
The composition he picked was the most natural. Something you could find during any regular visit to the waterfront. The showboat Majestic is original and a real treasure to have at the foot of Cincinnati. It keeps a otherwise modern waterfront from being empty of any old riverboats. As long as the showboat Majestic is on the landing, there is always a show in town!  
 
Cincinnati Enquirer, Page A6, October 16th, 1992  
 
Left center: Thomas George Lohre Jr., a New York City artist, works through the rain on a painting at Public Landing.  
 
Channel 12 WKRC-TV, 5 o'clock News, October 15th, 1992 
Tom had his picture taken and run in the Cincinnati Enquirer in a spread they did on the festival. Also he was on TV during the nightly news. "His quote for the TV reporter when he asked him what he thought about all the tickets for the boat rides being sold out was, "Don't worry about that money thing, Just come on down and experience the steamboats firsthand from along the bank, It's free."  
 
1992 Gross income $4,947; Net Income $885  
 
In NYC, January 28th, 1993. Drove to Cincinnati, Febuary 14th, 1993.  
 
In St. Louis, March 19th, 1993.  
Bok Tower, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", May 1990, Valued at $1000, Sold to Jimmy Eubanks in 1992 for $750 
Recieved title of Buick, May 18th, 1993. Moved out of Greenville and spent the Summer in New York City. Volunteered 225 hours on the sailboat, "Pioneer" in the South Street Seaport 
 
Jury duty in NYC, May 28th, 1993.  
Master Jude Austin, Pastel on paper, 8" x 10", 1993, Property of the Austin-Duval Family, Comparable at $500 
Tom sought to provide the finest example of pastel for the Austin Family. Jude was one year old and Tom would visit every week snapping a few shots every week until he had captured Jude's look. Then he set out to render the boy with as few a strokes as possible.  
Impression Seaport, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30",August 6th, 1993, Property of the artist 
 
Impressionist Delta Queen, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30"August 8th, 1993, Property of the artists
Drove to NYC, August 21, 1993.  
 
Moved into 3477 Morrison Place, Cincinnati, October 14th, 1993.  
South Street Seaport, Oil on canvas, 40"X 30", Fall, 1993, Property of Dr. & Dr. Lohre Gabel
Appreciating the painting of the South Street Seaport Museum is a rewarding experience. On glance and the viewer knows he is looking at something that will last forever. For eighteen months the artist, Tom Lohre worked on learning about the scene.  
 
The painting shows the nebulous of the original South Street Seaport Museum site. The schooner "Pioneer" in the foreground is the museum's flagship. One hundred and eight years ago, she was the finest vessel available for collecting foundry sand and had only one mast. She now takes passengers for tours. For 225 hours Tom volunteered on the "Pioneer" to learn about what he would later paint. The ship in the background is the "Regis Maris," of Greenport, New York. Her rigging was the predecessor to the single masted "Pioneer." The two masts of the current "Pioneer" were installed later because it makes her easier to handle, although slower in travel.  
 
The seaport painting shows the way the port looks today. A variety of life styles are depicted that bring the viewer into identify with someone in the crowd. Through the fine painting the viewer is the recipient of the artist's mastery of the sublime. The collective scene is distinctive in character and reflects emotions and feelings in each of us that are timeless and universal.  
 
Contrasts and paradoxes are common to the waterfront. The combination of the modern buildings with the ancient ships illustrates the new with the old. The viewer takes in the various vignettes from people walking down Fulton Street in Brooklyn to cars traveling across the East River. The appreciator wanders with his eyes through the crowd on the dock looking for someone because the people are painted so lifelike. Naturally, experiencing the seaport museum firsthand aids in making the painting more enjoyable. The ultimate trip would be to travel aboard the "Pioneer" seeing New York Harbor with full sail up, a stiff wind blowing and the sun setting the buildings aglow.  
 
The paintings shows the educational value of the museum. The Brooklyn Bridge, the first bridge in New York Harbor, plays well against the ancient sailing ships now turned into educational classrooms for the harbor masters of the future. The people waiting on the dock and those on board are shown what it is like to be part of sea life. Each aspect of the scene is pivotal in its ability to show the new with the old, the master with the student.  
 
No stone has been left unturned in completing this painting. It has a intrinsic value because of its finely assembled manner. It is a wonder of art. It vibrates, radiates and celebrates that inate sense of esthetic perception. The painting is a monument to the spiritualism of the sea.  
 
What makes such a painting? When the soul of the viewer and the creator have been touched, a larger happening has occurred. The painting brings out all the times in a person's life that are exciting. The painting began with Tom Lohre searching for all forms of the things around us to meld into one scene. Moment by moment he learned in slow motion the proper direction of the canvas.  
Mr. Crawford, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", September 18th, 1993, Valued at $1000, Property of the Behringer Crawford Museum 
 
Delta Queen, Watercolor on paper, 10" x 8", November 7th, 1993, Valued at $300, Sold to Mary Fultz 
In Kinston NC, November 29th, 1993  
Chris Demarkopolus & Grandson, Oil on canvas, 5" x 7", December 1st, 1993, Property of Chris Demarkpolus, Valued at $750 
Sold print to David Stolberg, December 6th, 1993.  
 
In Lexington, Kentucky, December 10th, 1993  
 
1993 Gross income 11,994; Net Profit $5,130  
Ed Hicks as Van Gogh March 94 Gradis 16X20 
 
La Z Boy Shop, Oil on canvas, 36" x 24", April 9th, 1994, Valued at $2,400, Commissioned by Sompop Thummakitpanith for $250 
Painted during Tom's honeymoon in Alaska  
Inland Passage One, Alaska, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30", Spring 94, Property of the artists
Inland Passage Two, Alaska, 40" x 30", Spring 94
Mendenhal Glacier, Alaska, 40" x 30", Spring 94
Ketchikan, Alaska, 40" x 30", Spring 94
 
Mount Denali, Alaska, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30", Spring 94, Property of the artist, Valued at $900 
Painted at the threshold of the Denali State Park. You can drive into the park only so far and at that part Tom left his car and hiked up the side of a small mountain about 1500 feet and spent the day painting in a strong wind that got worst. The bugs would land on him constantly and he spent the most part of painting slapping his face with his hat. Later in the day he realized that a bear could have come out of nowhere because of all the food he had left laying about. His only company was a large colony of ground squirrels which are a major source of food for the bears! Just as he came down the mountain it started to rain. He spent several days recuperating from the hike!  
Fountain Square I , Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", Spring 1994, $900 with frame, Property of the artist 
Painted during the first "Art on the Square" festival in downtown Cincinnati. Tom set up several days before to complete a few canvases before the festival. He was working in a open air space on the second story above a parking lot. He could not see the Fountain from where he was but since he had painted many fountain scenes in the past he did not have to see it. The manner of his work was heavy impressionism and that meant more interpretation than reality. Even the buildings were changed into stripes in the clouds. Tom's direction was to create a bouquet of colors like a flower arrangement using the fountain as a takeoff.  
Fountain Square I , oil on canvas, 20" x 24", 1994
 
Fountain Square II, oil on canvas, 20" x 24", 1994 
 
Fountain Square III, oil on canvas, 20" x 24", 1994
 
Mt Adams, oil on canvas, 20" x 24", 1994
 
Nantucket Fountain 
 
The River, Watercolor on paper, 10" x 8", Spring 1994, Property of Chuck Lohre 
 
Dr. Fredrick and Family, Watercolor on paper, 10" x 8", Winter 1995, Property of Dr. Fredrickn, Valued at $300 
Painted as a retirment gift for Dr. Fredrick. Tom used a boxful of snapshots from the family to assemble them into a fake scene of Dr. fredrick in his waiting room with all his family in the room. Of course there are a few people there who were not relatives. Tom also included his wife and the Doctor himself as a patient.  
James Dean, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Young Edward Albee, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Bob Dylan, Watercolor on painted Wild Turkey Whiskey bottle with the top cut off, 2.5" x 2.5" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Thomas Paine, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Walt Whitman, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Henry James, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Maxwell Bodenheim, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
John Wallowitch, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Tiny Tim, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Edna St.Vincent Millay, Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Eleanor Roosevelt, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Sam Shepard, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Alan Ginsberg, Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Black Marsha, Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Crystal Field, Watercolor on painted wine label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
George Bartenieff , Watercolor on painted wine label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Sylvia Miles , Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Sylvia Miles , Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Steve McQueen, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Edward Albee, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Edward Albee, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Edward Albee, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $50 
 
Jimmy Hendrix, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Jessica Lange, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Mattheu Bodine, Watercolor on painted 40oz beer label with the top cut off, 3" x 3" x 6", 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
"Greenwich Village Guidebook" published, Saint Martin's Press, May 4th,1994, Illustrator 
 
 
Thomas G. Lohre Jr., 1953-  
3477 Morrison Place; Cincinnati, Ohio 45220  
513-861-4146  
 
Artwork from 1987-1994 included in the four person show at KZF Gallery; The Grand Baldwin Building; Seventh Floor 655 Eden Park Drive; Cincinnati.) Ohio 4520'@' 513-621-6211  
August 11th through November 1994  
Works displayed by the artist  
Observatory  
Covington Tower #1  
Main Strauss Fountain #1.  
Sloppy Joe's  
Fancy Groceries  
Delta Queen, 10" x 8"  
In May of.1995 a pocket tour book of Greenwich Village will be published and include many of my "en plein air," paintings of the West Village.  Ever since 1976 I have maintained a small studio in the Village.  The book will commemorate the 200th year after the dedication of the Washington Square Arch.  
 
"Nantucket Main Street" was done during my second season of main street painting.  I really used the street to learn.  I discovered that the tunnel image created by a main street supplied the visual stimulus needed for a successful work.  In the beginning I was selling what I painted for low prices and slowly learning on the job.  Up to that point I was painting studio oils and found that I couldn't go through enough ideas fast enough to learn nor sell them for enough to justify my time.  
 
By using a four-color palette I was able to focus full attention on basic color.  I had the four tubes screwed into the palette and would just squeeze out what I needed.  I used three tubes colors that approximated process colors and white for my palette.  Later I learned that at least the- basic colors: alizarin crimson bright red.) Winsor yellow7 Windsor blue-P ultramarine blue & Winsor violet in the Winsor Newton line of colors were needed to mix a palette.  I look forward to using chemically mixed color whenever possible and avoid mixing color on the canvas.  
 
The "Inside Passage" was done as an experiment in placing various local items on top of a landscape.  Looking closely you  
 
"Pacific Club" was painted recently on location.  After completing the work I decided a smooth canvas surface and use of transparent color better depict reality.  I want to return to painting on silver surface.  The mirror quality of the material reflects light much the same way reality does.  The radical nature of this material may supply some public resistance.  
 
I've finally realized that painting is like writing the great American novel.  Everything has been done before; the success is in retelling it in a personnel way.  My new work will include all aspects of painting: transparency full color range, determined light and dark & human involvement.  
 
The large seaport painting is my attempt to duplicate the great masters in seascapes.  A gracious client paid me the agreed price7.then. Allowed me years to complete this work.  I have a policy of giving the client much more than they paid for so I can use their commission to improve my talent.  
 
Paintings are so expensive because the artist has one chance to sell his originals.  If he sells a work in ten years for top dollar he has made a good investment.  If he sells them early for a low price he has made a bad investment.  
 
I do not have one of my fine portraits in this show.  I cut my teeth on portraits and in the interim completed quite a few exceptional ones.  The works in this show illustrate my direction towards a wider repertoire.  
   
   
   
Pacific Club, Oil on canvas, 20"X 16", Summer 1994, painted after sailing to Nantucket from East Hampton in the Defiant.
On a return visit to Nantucket Tom returned to his "en plien air" style of painting. He had sold all the previous paintings of the Pacific House and used his time to replicate the canvas. For two Summers Tom worked on Main Street in Nantucket. He had staked out four views of Nantuckets famous fountain and painted the same four views all Summer. He would work on one then go to another view and in four or five days be painting the same scene again. He did this to learn. He had started his career as a portrait painter and used these days outside to study landscape color and compostion. The popularity of the scene allowed him to sell them for a paultry amount, enough to buy more paints, frames and canvases.  
Zero Main Street, Nantucket, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", Summer 1994
Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", Summer 1994
Show of art at the KZF Gallery, August 11th to November 1994, Cincinnati, Ohio 
This show started from meeting Daniel Brown, a art critic, who was curator of the gallery.  
Charleston Harbor, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", 1994, Property of Dr. Shane Gainey, Comparable at $2,400 
 
Carolina Piedmont , Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", Fall 1994, Property of the artist, Valued at $1,200 
Painting while on a field trip from a hotel window. Tom wanted to put a power tower in the middle like he had done in so many previous paintings but his wife talked him out of it.  

 

Winslow Homer Copy, 22" x 19", 1994, Property of the artist, $900, Additional copy owned by Bill Toby 
Painted as a exercise in learning watercolor. His friend showed Tom a print he wanted to get framed and Tom suggested that he have it copied. Tom always wanted to get into watercolor but needed just such a commission to get started. Copying the masters is the best way to learn.  

 

Mr. Newton, Charcoal on paper, 8X10, February 1995, Property of the Newton Family; Comparable at $100 
In this work Tim was interested in supplying his clients with a top notch work but in the format that was as simple as could be. But he still looks forward to working in a technique that his father would always say when Tom complained about not having some tool for his artwork. His Dad would say," You can do a masterpiece with a stick in the mud. Well, Tom still looks forward to doing just that.  

 

Savanna Home, 20" x 16", February 1995, Property of Louise 
Painted as a commission for. Tom painted this and another similar watercolor at the same time.  

 

Bahamas House, 20" x 16", March 3rd, 1995, Property of Irene Moore, Valued at $900 
Painted as a birthday gift to Irene. It shows Irene's favorite home in Hopetown Bahamas. Tom had painted several watercolors of the home while in Hopetown and in the studio but none a detailed as this gift. The watercolor technique took several years to master. Tom learned from English watercolor artists who painted in a refined form before the advent of quick expressive brush strokes. Turner, a master English watercolorist, started in this manner and later developed the fast and impressionistic manner we now associate with watercolor. Winslow Homer represents this latter manner.  

 

Greenwich Village Guide Book, by Saint Martins Press, Released May 5th, 1995 
Released on the 150th anniversary of the Village Arch in Washington Square. 27 celebrity watercolors and local oil paintings by Tom are in this book. The guidebook is a work of love by Village writers Bob Heide and John Gilman, explaining and revealing their Village.

 

Surf Fishing, Oil on canvas, 20"X 16", Fall 1995, Property of the Artist; Valued at $2,400 
This time while in Nantucket, Tom wanted to spend as much time as was needed to paint a fine canvas. He had learned that doing a painting in one day sometimes prevented the best possible result. He spent ten days working on the canvas. He always enjoyed a picture of the ancient skill of surf fishing in a book called "Men's Lives." He used several men that would hang around the shell fish shack. During the Winter, the station would play a important role towards saving lost schallopers. As they went out in the morning and spent the whole day out in the very cold waters, the station manager would keep track of their return. If someone was late he would send someone out to find them. Many times the motor on the boats would drown out the happenings around them and if someone was in trouble a fisherman would not realize the dangerous happenings around him. It was the station manger that would keep a lookout!  

 

Potbelly Stove Restaurant, New York, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", October 22-25 1995, Property of the Peeples Family, Valued at $900 
Painted from life just down the street from Tom's apartment. The Potbelly Stove Restaurant has been in Greenwich Village for many years. It once was in the shops just this way of the present restaurant. It just goes to show how you can put up stakes and move the whole restaurant somewhere else or just next door.  
 
The menu is one of the longest in the city. They have over fifty items for lunch and dinner. When he was working the owner gave him several passes for meals. Tom being the consummate starving artist enjoyed the meals with his roommate. The owner wanted to buy the painting but only wanted to pay $200. Tom later sold the painting for $900, a more reasonable price. Tom changed the two people's faces in the painting to the couple that bought it.  
 
There is a Chinese waiter who is always there peeking out the window. You can barely see him inside. The cut out of the bell boy is a fixture in the Village and everyday there is a trivia question on it and if you guess the answer you get a free coffee.  

 

Li Lac Chocolate, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", Fall 1995, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
Tom started this painting because it culminated his idea of a quaint city street. The chocolate shop is a familiar favorite in his neighborhood and working outside it for several days allowed him to get to know the servants of the surrounding shops and their manners. The wind was especially calm here whereas up the street it would be howling.  

 

Christopher St. Looking East, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Fall 1995, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
This view shows the artists home. The large red building on the left, built in 1876, was his residence for twenty years while he lived in New York City. His apartment was in the rear on the second floor. # 2 was a what was called a railroad car apartment because it was ten feet wide and 36 feet long with a kitchen and entrance in the center and bedroom in back and sitting room in the rear next to the windows along with the toilet. In the old days there was not toilet, just water and gas lights. Originally the building was built for workers from Italy. The view in the painting shows the local people. A man on a motored wheelchair, a girl with seeing eye dog and the ever common UPS truck and city bus.

 

Christopher St. looking West, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Fall 1995, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
Painted once an opportunity availed itself of a fine day. The dark left hand side of the painting was just the scene that Tom wanted to combine with the opposite light side of the painting. With both lights on the same canvas it assured the viewer of excitement. A photograph does not do it justice because the camera does not know what to image. On the right is a long time friend of the artist, Eric Travers, picking up yet another pretty girl on the street corner. To the left down on the lower left is the light of the Pot Belly Stove Restaurant. You can see a tugboat way off in the distance, on the Hudson River.  

 

Saint Xavier, Charcoal on paper, 8" x 10", 1995, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
 
Bok Tower, Oil on canvas, 20"X 16", Winter 1995, Property of the Eubank Family; Comparable at $1,200 
Painted during travels to the South. Tom was looking for a scene to paint between stops. He used his old "en plein air" manner and worked hard at putting everything he had in it and not to compromise on the time span. To accomplish this, Tom finished the canvas from photos taken in the field.  

 

Ireland, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", December 1995, Property of Maureen & Fred Keeley, Valued at $750 
Painted as a gift to Fred from Maureen for Christmas. They had traveled to Ireland and this was Fred favorite spot. While painting from the various photos I discovered that the piles in the foreground were wood and peat. The home seemed open in some places almost like the people lived with the animals. There were several boats in the harbor as if the men fished quite a bit or at least they used them for transportation. The hills were framed with stone walls much as if the stones were removed from the rocky soil and place where they could do no harm to the sparse vegetation.  

 

Margarete Hinzman, Oil on canvas, 16 x 20, December 25th, 1995, Property of the Hinzman Family; Comparable at $1000 
 
Georette the Dog, Watercolor on paper, 7 x 5, December 1995, Property of the Georette Family; Comparable at $150 
 
Li Lac Chocolate II, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", Febuary1996, Property Martha Gold, Valued at $750 
 
Village Delight, Oil on canvas, 16" x 20", Spring 96, Property of the artist, Valued at $900 
Painted on the street while Tom was having a show in the deli just to the left of the canvas. He learned a lot more about his neighborhood. The old man in the African chair is a steady fixture during warm days. One store owner found out that his salesman was stealing money to pay for his AIDS treatment. Just to the left out of the picture is a 5-minute massage place.  

 

The River, 16"X20", Oil on canvas, Spring 1996, $2,400 comparable, Property of the Linda Brown, Framed print 24" x 20" for $200 
The twenty by sixteen inch canvas was painted from the banks of the Ohio just South of the Suspension Bridges' Kentucky pier. Tom worked during the day and night from the shore, fleshing in the beginnings of the canvas. Later in the studio he realized the work. The undertaking is exceptional for its high quality of detail done in traditional style.  
 
There is quite a bit of "Tall Stack" activity in the painting. In mid stream the Delta Queen is well underway, going up river. The stadium is wholly lit with a baseball game in progress. All along the Kentucky side of the river from just below the bridge pier to the Licking river are stern wheelers tied up to shore. In the foreground is the "Donald B", a authentic stern wheeler tow boat. Closer to the viewer just off the shore is a river man in a john boat. On shore is the artist at a camp fire.  
 
Tom spend several nights on the river at night sketching in the scene. Later he reaffirmed his composition decision and worked over top of the preliminary oil sketch. This was a work where the beginning oil sketch was in many ways superior to the final detailed work. But Tom decided to paint over the initial oil sketch because he had cow towed to artisans without money and now he was producing a simple work for a deliberate client.  
 
A long time client Ms. Linda Brown commissioned this work. It was her husband that actually commissioned it for her Valentines day gift. Ms. Brown already had one painting of the suspension bridge, during the day, done by Tom Lohre and Ms. Brown wanted a night scene with the lights on the bridge! Well Tom, took the opportunity of Cincinnati's 1995 "Tall Stacks" Celebration to complete her wish. The first bridge painting took place on the banks of the Ohio during the day. Painting with the homeless people living right under the pier of the bridge. Now this painting had to be done in the studio. Tom did not have a painting of the Cinergy stadium and decided to included it into the already crowded composition.  
 
Back in the studio, Tom finely rendered the many aspects of the scene. He starts with the background and works forward. As in all of Tom's work, he paints like he is building each object with paint. The stadium supports have all the strength to hold up the stands and the lights illuminate the interior area. The bridge piers are strongly laid up to hold the cables. The iron girders are carefully fitted together to hold the roadway. The stern wheeler in the foreground is assembled in the same way it was in the shipyard. All the constituents are formed as though the maker himself was involved.  
 
Tom grew up in Northern Kentucky. His first job was working on the "Mike Fink," a floating restaurant moored just down river from the Licking River. His job was to wash the decks and maintain the outside of the marina. Spending time on the river as a young man had a indelible impression on Tom. Legendary river man, Capt. Beatty owned the restaurants Mike Fink and Captain Hook plus a large menagerie of various cranes and work boats for river salvage jobs. The stern wheeler in the foreground of the painting represents the tow boats on the river that Tom worked on. He fondly remembers his boss, a large black man named Henry, whose parents were slaves. Henry worked most of his life for Capt. Beatty. Another one of Tom's bosses was Duey of Newport.  
 
His sister owned the riverboat restaurant right up the river from the "Fink." He would scoot about in a oak yawl taking care of the various jobs and lines needing attention. While Beatty's Navy, the collection of salvage equipment, was laid up he would take care of maintaining them. Tom would sometimes travel with him in the yawl like the one in the foreground of the painting.  

 

Morrison Place, 16"X12", Oil on canvas, Spring 1996, Valued at $750, Property of Moira Rafferty and Rob Bass 
Rob and Moira were moving and wanted a painting for memories of their stay in Cincinnati. Tom suggested a panoramic view of the street with them walking their dog. Tom wanted to paint in the light sky and dark land manner he developed in 1992 and executed in the Covington Landing painting. In this canvas he lighten up the foreground just enough to make a exciting composition. The painting reminded the owners of a Peter Breughel, a Flemish painter of peasants. It solves the clients interest and gives the "pass by viewer" a lot to latch onto. Tom knows the painting combines a gray mood with a normal street scene giving the viewer a rewarding meaningful experience. Tom's wife liked it so much she did not want to give it up!  

 

Theo Austin, Pastel on paper, 8"x 10", June 96, $500, Austin Family 
Painted as a companion piece for their first child, Jude. He worked with a different palette than Jude because Theo's coloring was from his Father. This time Tom mixed his own pastels. This was a big first. The last time he mixed pastels was for a jewelry dealer than wanted him to copy a Boudin. This will be the procedure in the future for all pastels. Tom feels that the less manipulation on the surface the more appealing the result.  

 

Trixie Delight's Immortalizing Mural, 4- 7' x 7', Oil on canvas, August 19th, 1996, Property of Linda Brown, Valued at $10,000 each, 
Normally, a strip bar patron seeks anonymity! At Trixie Delight's, a Newport, Kentucky strip bar the patrons are beautifully painted on murals in the windows of the bar! The owner, Linda Brown, retired Las Vegas striptease hall of fame, requested her family portrait to be one of the murals, because initially patrons were cautious to be publicly illustrated. That was before the project started getting a lot of publicity. Now Trixie Delight's patrons are standing in line to be part of the immortalizing project. Even one patron being painted said he wants his ex wife to drive by everyday and see his portrait because she never liked him to go to the strip bar.  
 
It all started with Ms. Brown wanting to repaint the front of her bar and the City of Newport, Kentucky suggesting that the club be restored it to its original storefront. As part of its main street restoration, the city awarded the bar a five thousand dollar grant to help with costs. City manager Jim Parsons said that while the city may not condone Trixie Delight's adult entertainment, it wouldn't be right to exclude the bar from the Monmouth Street's refurbishing program. Since the original bar had plate glass windows all around Ms. Brown needed an idea to cover the windows. That's when the Kentucky State historical coordinator suggested murals be painted to placed in the window frames.  
 
Ms. Brown, an established art patron, had previously commissioned fine portrait artist Tom Lohre to paint her individual family member portraits. She again commissioned Mr. Lohre, to design and execute this project. He naturally jumped at the chance and decided a straight forward approach with a simple background and patron portraits as the best tack to take. When he talks about the mural project people think he is painting the murals right in the dancers' dressing room. Of course he doesn't let on that he is creating the masterpiece in his Cincinnati, Ohio studio.  
 
The murals are four canvas panels, seven by seven feet. Each of the panels are painted with red curtains, valence and lower curtains along with an embossed ceiling, and two cafe lights on either side mounted on wood paneling. Behind the foreground are patrons and local citizens. There are no ladies in the murals except Ms. Brown behind the bar toasting with friends and family. With one exception, there will be one dancer on stage in the distance with two feather fans exposing her feet and head in the main panel. Mr. Lohre steered away from depicting the dancers because Trixie Delight's real life dancers are center stage.  
 
The new marquee above the entrance will have pressed metal edging in a octagon shape with small light bulbs around the outside. The front door will be well carved. The overall effect will be that of Green's, a old time bar that used to be in the same space.  
 
The opening went off without a hitch after Tom spent about two twelve hour days installing the murals! There was a great crowd and most of the people in the murals showed up. You will have to drive by and see the finished facade! As you might imagine a few girls got on stage during the opening much to the interest of the art going public! The opening proceeded to 8:30 pm then promptly turned into the old club with the bartender gently suggesting to the hangers-on that the opening was over and they had better leave!  
 
Trixie Delight's address is 846 Monmouth Street; Newport, KY 41071  
 
Articles written about the murals:  
 
Bob Driehaus, "Helping Trixie's Facelift", Kentucky Post, June 6th, 1996  

 

Queensboro Bridge, 16" x 12", Oil on canvas, Summer 1996, $750 comparable, Property of the Britta Gomez, Framed print 16"X20" for $175 
Painted in the studio after much research on location and in the New York Public Library. Ms. Gomez commissioned the painting to remind her of her New York City when she returned home to El Salvador. Working for the United Nations has allowed her to travel all over the world but she keeps on coming back to New York City to the United Nations Headquarters.  
 
She lives in Queens and takes the subway everyday. Along the way she sees the Queensboro bridge and the United Nations building. It was this scene that she wanted to capture. Tom took her lead and went to the New York Public Library to research Queensboro Bridge scenes from their picture file. It was here that he discovered that there was a large park just North of the Bridge on the Queens side. Tom went to that park and studied the multiplicity of views there.  
 Back in the studio Tom worked on the composition. He had to include Manhattan from the United Nations building to the tramway of Roosevelt Island. After various changes he settled on this angle.  
Mr. & Mrs. Niehaus, Watercolor on paper, 8" x 10" each, Property of Mrs. Niehaus, valued at $150 each 
Painted as a gift for Mrs. Niehaus sons. Once the artwork was done Tom took pictures of the portraits and print and framed them in pairs for her four sons. Mr. Niehaus is no longer with us and Tom used a photograph for him and Mrs. Niehaus posed for a photo to match his and Tom finished the work with life sittings.  
 

Three Painted Bottle Labels In A Box, 13"X 8", Summer 96, Property of the Artist, Valued at $750 

Painting on bottle labels started in 1992 in New York. Tom was looking for a inexpensive way to experiment with a watercolor technique he was developing and then have a way to make them a stand alone. A vase was made by cutting the top off. In the beginning he painted erotic figures. Now he paints figures from the news. Of these three bottle labels two are performers on TV and the other is Loriana Bobbit. On the reverse of Loriana is John Wayne. The box format provides closure for the form gives the bottles a way to be hung on the wall.  

 

Irving Berlin's Home, 10" x 8", Oil on canvas, Fall 1996, Property of the artist, Valued at $2,400 
Painted on the street while Tom's wife, Irene was hacking out important positions for the American Geriatric Society in NYC. Tom staked out a place off Beekman Place and painted Irving Berlin's old home. It is now the Duchy of Luxembourg. While painting, a proverbial who's who of America walked by. Mrs. Faulkner, painter of the flower love stamp; a famous architect, who was escorted by the most beautiful of young ladies, he told the story that Irving was a painter but not a very good one; a Mrs. Barnes who wanted to see the final work; Dan Korman, who coincidentally was the main street coordinator for my Trixie Delight's murals and who now has a job working for the Carnegie Hill Restoration Committee, John Wallowitch, and many others, who dropped by all day watching the progress.  
 
Probably the most curious was the doorman of 12 Beekman. Irving gave him a painting. After his death it was his job to clean out the home. Mrs. Berlin never threw anything away so early every morning he would clean out the home and a private hauler would meet him to take the stuff away. He said his wife would not let him keep all the stuff. After awhile the neighborhood got wind of him throwing things out every morning. He would place things into the dumpster and they would remove them until the home was empty!  

 

John Beatty, 18" x 20", Pencil on paper, Fall 96, Valued at $175, Property of Betty Payne 
This is the sketch for a full size oil painting of the legendary river man, John Beatty. The two boys are Tom and his identical twin brother. The woman is Mrs. Beatty. Tom wants to remember John Beatty's interest in teaching young people about the river. He was known for the time he took to explain complicated mechanical systems to his novice river men that worked for him on some of the most fascinating salvage jobs on the inland waterways.  
 
Tom's first job was working for Captain Beatty on his floating restaurant, "Mike Fink's." He washed the deck, took out the trash and painted. His immediate boss was Henry Williams, a old black man whose parents were slaves. Eventually Tom went on to work on Captain Beatty's salvage rig raising sunken barges and such. Captain Beatty died several years ago and since then Tom has been interested in painting his portrait and doing illustrations of his time spent on the salvage rig to stimulate interest in river lore.  

 

Hockey Helmut, Oil on helmet, Fall 1996, Valued at $175, Property of the Norris Family 
Painted on location for a very attentive mother. Not a lot of boys have such a goalie helmet with a attacking red tail hawk hand painted on it. It makes for a very intimating look! Mrs. Norris supplied several pictures of a red tail hawk and Tom just arrived with his paints and went to work around the various holes and curves of the helmet. Master Norris had taken off the various clasps and guards to make painting it easier. Afterwards the helmet was given several coats of lacquer at a auto body shop.  

 

Jesus, Mary & Joseph, For Covington Catholic High School, Oil on canvas, 30"X 40", Winter 96, Property of the Class of 1971, Comparable at $5000 with frame 
 
Dr. Leon Boothe, 36" x 24", Fall 1996, Valued at $2,400, Property of Dr. Leon Boothe 
Painted in the studio during a span of ten years. Tom is a graduate of Northern Kentucky University and wanted to paint the presidents. He started Dr. Boothe ten years ago but decided to put it on the back burner when he was not satisfied with the beginning and it looked like Dr. Boothe would be president for quite a long time. Finally ten years later Dr. Boothe left the position and the painting was completed. The face stayed the same while the background was changed to included the campus. The clothes were the last thing to be done. The result is a painting that spans three different styles.  

 

The Story of Tom & Irene's Trip to Asia, November 18th to December 7th, 1996 
Our three week Asian trip started with Hong Kong and then Japan. In Hong Kong the mountains are steep and there is not much flat land before the water. The Hong Kongese live in the mountains on winding roads with steep cliffs. In China red soil abounds with farming taking up every inch. China is moved by people and Hong Kong by machines. The ability of the Hong Kong to finance improvements is basic to the difference. China does not finance and wants Hong Kong returned with no debt!  President Clinton told the head of China that the environment is the biggest problem for them. You can realize why he said that after experiencing the pollution in China and Hong Kong. I hear that it is much worst in Bangkok. It would seem that pollution does not have to be a aspect of advancement. China uses a lot of foam food cartons. They litter the shores and waterways. After we got our Asian legs we spent several days with Irene's roommate from college. They treated us with exceptional hospitality and went way out of their way to accommodate us. Emiko and Kato live in the country on the Eastern peninsula of Tokyo Bay. Their home was most charming and a first class way for us to be introduced to Japanese living. We spent our time sight seeing and eating the most extraordinary foods. We sadly missed Emiko and Kato after they dropped us off at my friends home in Tokyo. The rental car even had a gps driven map. It showed where you were and what turns to take to your destination. It spoke in a female voice! In Japan they place such high taxes on vehicles yearly that most are only a few years old.  After a day in Tokyo we took the bullet train to Kobe to visited Irene's American friends, Katheleen & Stu. They are in Kobe because Proctor & Gamble's international headquarters is there. They live in a spacious high rise with four bedrooms and four baths. On the tenth floor you can see the fantastic harbor with the most modern facilities. The day before Thanksgiving we had dinner at a special Kobe beef restaurant. On Thanksgiving we visited Himeji Castle. I painted a small canvas and later met Irene and Katheleen at home. Thanksgiving dinner was the finest seasoned tofu!  
Upon leaving Kobe we stayed two nights at a Japanese style inn located on the grounds of the Mishima fertility shrine in Kyoto. The fertility ceremony was preformed by the shrine's monk who also was the inn keeper. Irene is not suppose to eat eel for two weeks! As it turns out the Mishima Shrine is also the same shrine for eel farmers. Eel tastes a lot like catfish. It is a fresh water fish that goes out to sea and returns much like salmon! The shrine is quite hidden and it took us a full three hours to find it. Of course the big draw back was the language and in the end I had to match line for line the symbols of the Japanese language to find the street! We focused on learning Japanese. Cantonese is tonal and difficult to learn. In Kyoto we hooked up with my friend Yuso. I had painted his portrait in NYC ten years ago! We quickly traveled to many shrines under his prefect tutelage. Golden Pagoda, Zen rock garden and Geisha girls all came our way and enthralled us. The weather was prefect Fall and the colors could only be topped by the Spring cherry blossoms. Japan is homogeneous in terrain and people from top to bottom. Only the crops vary according to weather and latitude. There are persimmon trees in Tokyo. Tea and oranges grow just a little South of Tokyo. Once back in Tokyo we had two days left on our rail pass and took two day trips. One to a small city just a hour South and another to a city on the Sea of Japan. To get to the later we took the bullet train right through the Japanese alps. Twenty minutes in a tunnel going 120 miles per hour is quite a experience! In the North they tie up the pine trees and bushes so the snow does not distort the fine work of the prunes. Pruning and landscaping is rampant in Japan. If I did some of the things to the trees here that they do there I would be arrested! We ate a lot of noodles. Always a bowl of noodles with a main dish of rice and fish. They make the noodles by stretching the dough until it is as thin as possible. The water makes them expand to about one eighth inch in diameter. The tempura was exceptional. We dined as quests at the best tempura restaurant in Tokyo. Irene's Japanese roommate from UNC husbands uncle treated us. He was a pilot in WW II. His first mission was August 17th, 1945. On the way to bomb the American base at Siapan he was called back because the Japanese had surrendered! He would have surly died. Those missions were kamikaze, without enough fuel to return. I bought Japanese WW II boots. More like cloth high top socks with a thin rubber sole. The toes and big toe separated so they could slip into sandals. The old workmen wear them with breeches. Irene and I visited the incendiary bombing display at the Edo Museum. 200,000 people died in the fires of Tokyo, more than the atomic bombs dropped. Japanese housing is wood frame with mud walls making fire a big problem. Many of the Shrines and Temples are destroyed by fire. The volcanic mountains have eroded to create vast flatlands that in circle the mountains. People do not live in the mountains leaving them to live surrounded by rice patties and vegetable plots. Fishermen work the hundreds of canals caused by the drainage from the mountains. Japan is a country of endless canals. The big part of Japan's people is their homogeneous wealth. All except the illusive poor and corporate heads are just about in the same income bracket. There is insulation from foreign competition. When the Japanese change they change from the top down and all at once. If the government decided that it was ok to eat foreign rice then the next day all of the Japanese would eat foreign rice! Rice, telephone service and banking are all uniquely Japanese. To obtain a new telephone line is a very expensive and lengthy process so most of the young people have mobile phones! Not embarrassing others is a big part of the Japanese way. Making inroads into their market is just as easy as finding a way for a win win situation!  Our most gracious host Yuso in Tokyo has three tips for his countrymen who go to America. (1) Do not slurp your soup if it has no noodles. The Japanese hold their noodle soup up to their mouth and slurp, shoveling the noodles in with their chop sticks. (2) Do not say yes when you mean you understand. The Japanese have the habit of saying "Hite"(Yes) many times during a conversation meaning that they understand what you are saying, but in the US that could mean you agree to what is being said. (3) No smoking in meetings. Smoking cigarettes is a big thing. I believe cigars will eventually have a huge market there when the Japanese stop smoking from habit. My Grandmother Higgins spent some time in the Philippines. Grandfather was a tank commander in the Army and they spent a few years there. My mother learned to speak the Tigala language, she was three! She said that when they left the Philippines, by boat, a whale followed them all the way across the Pacific!  

 

Hong Kong, Oil on canvas, 12" x 16", Fall 1996, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
Painted on location, Tom was looking for a location that showed the old with the new. He found that is very hard because most buildings only last ten years. The building in the foreground is a hospital located just up the hill from the Governors Mansion. The buildings in the background are two landmarks of Hong Kong Central: The Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Center on the left and the Bank of China on the right. Tom painted from the Hong Kong Zoo, which offered a relatively quite place to work from.  

 

Hong Kong Sketch, Pencil on paper, 8" x 10", Fall 1996, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
Sketched as a preliminary drawings for the painting. Tom had to sketch out the composition along the roadway because that afforded the best view. He could not have painted there because of the smog. Right at the sight, several roads converged and the pollution was just to much to take all day. Once the sketch was completed he moved up a cliffside to a small walkway along the edge of the zoo.

 

China Farmer, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", Fall 1996, Property of the artist
Painted in China from the zoo at Guangzhou formally Canton. During painting in the aviary section of the zoo all kinds of strange sounds came from out of the bushes. He painted in front of the eagle's cage. The cages were built to look like archaic housing structures of the past. The center of the aviary was a field of red flowers attended by gardeners. The painting became compilation of all the sights he had seen while in China. All during the day strange sounds came from the bushes, a combination of Chinese opera and bird sounds.  
Hong Kong Harbor, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", Fall 1996, Property of the artist
Painted during a afternoon in Kowloon, in front of the Art Museum on the promenade. Hundreds of people walked by that afternoon and most stopped to see the artist painting. Tom took a photograph of a junk and place it into the scene of the harbor looking towards Hong Kong Island. On top of the hill is a Shinto looking structure that is actually a office building right where the tramway ends at Victoria Peak. The section of town right in front of the Peak is called Central.

 

Emiko & Kato's Home, Pencil on paper,12" x 16", Fall 1996, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
Sketched from memory, Tom wanted to capture what he had experienced. With travel being so hectic he did not had time to spend all day working in this tranquil country. Irene & Tom's stay in Chiba was the real Japan. Small traditional homes spread out among the cultivated fields.  

 

Himeji Castle, Japan, 8" x 10", Oil on canvas, Fall 1996, $750 with frame, Property of the artist 
Painted in front of the entrance to the castle. Looking quite fragile, the castle is really a fortress. The small holes in the foreground building are guns ports. The only vulnerable part is the eaves of the roof which are wood. On the land just to the right were the homes of the shoguns, since burned down because of the tender box nature of the Japanese buildings. The composition is quite Western and the Japanese recognize the western influence immediately because of the clouds. The painting shows the castle on the left with its side in the painting. Just to the right is the city of Himeji and in the right foreground is a flat area of grass. The clouds in the painting are rolling and variegate the whole sky.  

 

Ancient Japanese Ship, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", Fall 1996, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
Painted from a window over looking the canals of Tokyo. The ship was taken from various photographs. At one time the Japanese ruled the seas with ships like this but after a few Dutch and Portuguese arrived in Japan with their caravels the emperor restricted the Japanese sailors from traveling away from Japan for fear of diluting the culture of Japan. In another way the Japanese started WW II because of their fear that the culture of Japan would be destroyed because of foreign conquest of Japan.  

 

Breaking the Bank at Monte Carlo, Oil on canvas, 4' x 3', Winter 1997, Valued at $10,000, Property of Mark Sullivan 
This is a painting that Tom started in 1990! A lot of planning went into the painting and he actually planned too much and put the painting on the back burner. He started the painting in New York City, spending the Summer working on various sketches and sending them to Mark Sullivan in Greenville, South Carolina, for suggestions. Tom had recently spent a whole year in Greenville working as "artist in residence" for Beverly Klyce, Dick Foster and Mark Sullivan. Tom had met Beverly and Mark in New York City where Mark's brother Nelson had lived. Tom had painted Nelson's portrait many years previous. Later at a art auction of Tom's, Tom met Beverly and Mark. It was the beginning of a long friendship. In Greenville, Tom lived in the garage apartment. Beverly did all of the commissioning and it was only at the end of his stay that Mark commissioned this painting. The scene did not really take place. Beverly Klyce commissioned two portraits to be started in Monte Carlo. Later when they arrived back home, Mark commissioned this painting. Tom spent nine days in Monte Carlo working on the backgrounds of the portraits before they arrived. He stayed in a small hotel called Hotel E'toile which means Star Hotel. The hotel was in a small alley way within walking distance of the casino grounds. They had a restaurant on the first floor and you could have your daily meals there. Tom treated his clients to a lunch and they found it to be one of the best in Europe. The Monte Carlo Grand Prix news reporters would had been staying at this hotel for twenty years. The whole block was slated for demolition and it would mean the end of a era in Monte Carlo. In the painting, Mark and his friends along with the Royal Family of Monaco are all gathered around a craps table toasting champagne glasses. The painting takes place in the main room of the grand casino in Monte Carlo. Tom was not allowed to sketch in the Casino nor take photographs so relied mostly on postcards for his research material on the casino. He slowly built up a large collection of photographs of the Royal Family in preparation to painting them. Tom's mentor, R_, works for the Royal Family. Back in 1981, Tom was living with his master assisting him on studio duties. The people in the painting are separated into two groups. On the left are the Royal Family of Monaco. From left to right are: Princess Stephanie, Princess Caroline, Prince Albert and Prince Rainer. Mark Sullivan's friends are on the right. From right to left are: Tom Lohre, a New York lawyer, Beverly Klyce, Mark Sullivan, Dick Foster, Bob Foster and Fancy below. The inspiration for the painting came from a popular painting by P.S. Kroyer called, "Three Cheers." It is a impressionist painting of a group of men and ladies dressed in turn of the century clothes toasting around a table in a wooded setting with the sunlight poking through the bushes. Tom wanted to do something similar but did not go with the impressionist manner but a tight academic manner. The difference between the two can certainly mean the success or failure of a painting. Tom's decision to do a smooth surface traditional detailed realistic painting instead of a loose impressionistic painting meant that the people in the painting would be more important than the scene. In the end Tom felt that it would have been better to do the painting as a impressionist piece but then he would have not been able to take advantage of the opportunity to produce a superbly detailed classical work.
To paint on the grounds of the Casino, Tom had to get permission. He wrote a formal letter and submitted it to Society de Mer Bain, (The Bathing Society) or government of Monte Carlo. It took four days for him to get permission and Tom used the time to sketch out the various sights. The two portraits were of Beverly and her girlfriend Caryl. When Marks' party arrived Tom moved in with them in the Hotel De Paris, where the room cost two thousand dollars a day! He finished the portraits in Greenville, South Carolina where he was Beverly's artist in residence for over a year!   
Someone did break the bank in Monte Carlo in 1862.  
Kershaw Pond (unfinished), Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", March 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
 
Vic's Old Home, 7" x 5", Watercolor on paper, Winter 97, $175 comparable, Property of the Stacksteder Collection, Framed print 7" x 5" for $45 Vic's home burned to the ground in the Summer of 1996. The cause was suspicious and considered a arson hate crime. The event so moved Tom that he did a watercolor of it as a gift as an attempt to supply some closure to a very sad and difficult event.  

 

Florida Bench, 7" x 5", Watercolor on paper, Winter 97, valued at $175, Property of Annie Milburn 
Long time patron, Annie Milburn commissioned this logo for the Surfside Club Memorial Fund stationary. Tom at once thought of having a empty bench looking out to a Western Florida sunset once he looked at the photos supplied by Annie. He carefully rendered the scene to provide a proper contrast so it could be printed in black and white.  

 

Dolly the Beagle, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", Winter 1996, Property of Annie & Joe Milburn, Valued at $150 
This work was done as a Christmas present. Tom did another such portrait the Christmas before of "Georgette" for Annie & Joe. When gift giving gets complicated because the recipient has so many things, a fine work of art about something personnel is a excellent choice. The manner of the watercolor is one Tom perfected while studying Thomas Rowlandson, a English seventeenth century artist.  

 

David Little with Monica, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", Spring 1997, Property of David Little, Valued at $150 
Painted as a invitation for David's bachelor party. It is done in the tradition of before and after cartoons of marriage. Where the first version is with the fiancÚ helps his spouse to be and in the after he all but ignores her. In the background is Cincinnati and Mt. Adams. The painting was done is a simple but elegant manner of applying three shades of color and three weights of pen to create form.  

 

Showboat below Mt. Adams, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", May 18th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $400 
Painted during the annual "Duveneck Art Show" sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Heritage League, at George Rogers Clark Park at the foot of Greenup in Covington, Kentucky. The painting is done in an impressionistic manner with the Ohio River in the foreground and the showboat "Majestic docked where it usually is, at the foot of Broadway on Cincinnati Landing. In the background is Cincinnati's most tranquil mount. Mount Adams with the center piece the church of the Immaculata. The time of day is the early morning and the city is mostly in dark shadow with the sky light lemon yellow with it turning blue towards the corners of the painting. It is a small painting framed with a ornate gold leaf replica of a 1800's French frame.  

 

Delta Queen Landing in Cincinnati, Oil on canvas, 40" x 30", June 11th, 1997, Property of the Susan Lohre
This painting is the companion of Tom's earlier, same size work of South Street Seaport. His sister and her husband commissioned the two of them six years ago. Tom delivered the first painting in the Spring of 1992 and now is glad to deliver the second. It took so long because of the massive detail in the work and the resolve not to deliver a inferior work. It was Tom's intention to rival all other work in these two paintings. The first work was of the restored seaport in New York City near Wall Street. It had about thirty people on board the schooner "Pioneer" and about the same number on the wharf. In this "Delta Queen" painting there were substantially more people. The paintings shows the steamboat Delta Queen just finished docking at Cincinnati Landing. To the left of the Queen is the permanently moored showboat Majestic. In the distance you can see the traditional river front of Covington, Kentucky with its famous suspension bridge built by John Robeling and finished in 1860. Just behind the bridge is the modern office tower and contemporary Covington Landing. Tom used hundreds of photographs and on site painting for the painting. He took many photographs of the all three of the "Tall Stacks" celebrations in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the year, while the Delta Queen was docked where it is now in the painting, Tom would be there studying and recording all the details that would be used for the painting. Tom obtained floor plans of the Delta Queen so he could reproduce the boat to the point you could recognize any part of the boat. On shore, Tom used people he knew to populate it. He hired a horse drawn carriage and had his wife, his brother Steve and his wife Becky pose, riding in the carriage. The carriage is owned by his high school classmate, John Meyer. You can read the telephone number on the back of the carriage. For the mounted horseman Tom used his friend, Chester Salisbury and his horse Gabriel. On shore from left to right are a little girl Tom saw during one of the Queen's many arrivals in Cincinnati. His sister Susan, the owner of the painting and her son, Mikey Gabel. Far behind his sister are two children along the water's edge. Then there is Doctor Larry Johnson, Edna Rosenberg, Tom Umfrid and Chuck Jordan. Below Chuck Jordan is a baby carriage and a small girl. Next in the far background is R_, Tom's mentor and teacher of many years. Once again there is Mikey Gabel, Tom's nephew and his Father, Dr. Michael Gabel. To the right of Dr. Gabel is a backpacking girl Tom saw at one of the "Tall Stack" celebrations and next to her is legendary river man, Captain John Beatty. Tom's first job was working for Captain Beatty as a deckhand on his floating restaurant the Mike Fink's. Later Tom would work with Captain Beatty during his salvage operations. Captain Beatty had a tremendous impact on Tom and it is this impact that has driven him to do this and other Ohio River paintings. It is Tom's mission to preserve Captain Beatty's memory in a series of paintings of him and his doings on the river. After Captain Beatty are two sophisticated women who represent the many clients of Tom's. In the foreground are two of Tom's cousins and above them is another girl Tom found in one of his many photographs of the view. Tom, himself comes next as a large foreground figure and next to him is his identical twin brother, Chuck. In between them are several of the employees of the Delta Queen going over the details of the arrival. To finish off the view are a few of the period dressed characters hired by the Queen for the passengers and finally some of the crew members tending to the mooring. On the gang plank are the waiters of the Queen putting on a show for the tourists in the manner of a Mari Gras Celebration. On the "Showboat Majestic's" upper deck are two actresses and going to the right of them are the passengers of the steamboat. On top of it all is the pilot surveying the docking.  
Piedmont Park Gazebo I, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", May 8th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
Tom spend a lot of time in Atlanta and got to know the city quite well. He has painted all over the region and of all the places he likes this gazebo in Piedmont Park. In the past he did a impressionistic canvas of it and always wanted to return. He did started two paintings each on different days. The traffic through that area of the park is quite thick and he was never without human subjects. Most Atlantians have fond memories of the gazebo.   
The painting shows the gazebo as the focal point and people milling around. A man fishes to the right and a couple court each other inside the gazebo. The wind is blowing and moving the water in a sweeping motion towards the bridge causeway. In the back ground is the public swimming pools and on the left is a weeping willow with steps that lead up to a children play ground.  
Piedmont Park Gazebo II, 10" x 8", May 9th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
 
Showboat below Mt. Adams, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", May 18th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $400 
Painted during the annual "Duveneck Art Show" sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Heritage League, at George Rogers Clark Park at the foot of Greenup in Covington, Kentucky. The painting is done in an impressionistic manner with the Ohio River in the foreground and the showboat "Majestic docked where it usually is, at the foot of Broadway on Cincinnati Landing. In the background is Cincinnati's most tranquil mount. Mount Adams with the center piece the church of the Immaculata. The time of day is the early morning and the city is mostly in dark shadow with the sky light lemon yellow with it turning blue towards the corners of the painting. It is a small painting framed with a ornate gold leaf replica of a 1800's French frame.  

 

Jesus Mary & Joseph, Oil on canvas, 30" x 40", May 22nd. 1997, Property of Covington Catholic High School. Valued at $11,000 
Tom started this painting with the permission of his graduating class. He met with the development committee of Covington Catholic with the sketch he had prepared. After some initial suggestions he presented the final sketch. The committee suggested that Joseph needed a beard and was supposed to look about 7 years older than Mary. Photographs had to be taken of the landscape, which was to show the school, costumes, faces and foreground. Tom traveled all over the area to complete the research material. He even drove to the Marianist center in Dayton, Ohio to study the material in their Mary Library.  
For about a month he worked on the canvas. Painting the clothes first and then the background and finishing with the faces. He waited until last to paint Mary's face. Tom used his nephew for Jesus and his wife for Mary. One of the class of 1971's father, who was in the first graduating class at Covington Catholic in 1929, played the part of Joseph. Tom used his military photograph for the painting.   
This was a traditional portrait for Tom. All the aspects of classical portrait painting applied to this work. His intention was to replicate the masters. Religious painting is very set in its ways and to rehash the past will display things of the present. The result would be considered a improvement to the present day culture.   
By painting people without regard for their resemblance to a individual allows the artist to just express himself. During the formal portrait the subject takes the foreground and plays off himself creating a center effect that must be addressed.   
Tom did this painting as a donation to his alma mater. In his line of work it is difficult to maintain business relations. He finds charity promotional work of this nature allows him to paint but still not compromise his position as a preeminent artist.

 

Evanswood Place, Oil on canvas, 24" x 30", June 15th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $950 
Received denial of grant application from City of Cincinnati, July 1st, 1997  

 

Gentry Warehouse, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", July 17th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
 
Newport Art & Music Fest, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", July 26th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $950 
 
Key Deer, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", August 13th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $300 
 
Barracuda, Oil on canvas, 16" x 12", August 14th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $750 
 
Clifton Fest, Oil on canvas, 10" x 8", September 26th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $950 
 
Ben Lucien Burman, Pencil on paper, 16" x 20", October 14th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $150 
The Ben Lucien Burman portrait idea came from a bronze roadside plaque dedicated to him that is placed near his homestead along the Kentucky side of the Ohio River down river from the mouth of the Licking river . Tom used the time he had at the Behringer-Crawford FreshArt event and to do the sketch while reading his books on the bank of Prisoner's Lake.  
 
The sketch's resemblance to Ben Burman is as good as the sketch needed to be. He looks forward to submitting this portrait idea to the Cincinnati Artist Grant Program this coming Spring. He would be painting the portrait while visiting various classes in the Cincinnati School District. His intention is to get the children to read Ben Burman's books and teach them a little about painting. The final painting would hang in the children's library at the Cincinnati downtown branch.  
 
The portrait shows Ben Burman on the bank of the Ohio nearby where the plaque stands. He is wearing a suit and holds a notebook in his hand while the characters of his children's books surround him. In the background is Mt. Adams, a old steamboat and a modern towboat. Tom looks forward to getting some good pictures of Ben Burman from the Tulane Library where his papers are. Some other paintings he wants to do of this nature are John Beatty and Harlan Hubbard.  
Delta Queen Valley, Oil on canvas, 20" x 16", November 9th, 1997, Property of the artist, Valued at $950 
 
Mr. Mrs. Feldkamp, Charcoal on paper, 8" x 10", November 25th, 1997, Property of the Lukey Family, Valued at $140 apiece 
Executed in the classical manner of three color charcoal on tinted paper. By selecting a paper color that just barely makes the white noticeable form can be created akin to a duotone print. Red highlights the cheeks, lips and eyes. Black charcoal highlights the dark passages of the image. By using a shading stick, a piece of paper rolled up into a stick and tapered to allow smudging, the fine shadows can be added to the form making qualities of this method.  
 
The black & white photo of Mrs. Lukey was taken several years earlier. Mr. Lukey posed for a photograph to match the one of Mrs. Lukey. Traditional rules of portraiture were applied while transferring the portrait image from the photos to the drawing paper. A few of those techniques were to lighten the shadows. Enhancing the personal qualities of Mr. and Mrs. Lukey and while faltering the face without distorting the perception of their personality is essential. Additional form was created by leaving a lighted part on the edge of the face in the shadow.  
 
The additional information available from photos of the their children was especially important. From such photos you can decipher various features in the parents that are important character elements to be incorporated into the drawing. Tom also used a famous sketch by Piazzetta, 1682-1754 Italian of a Peasant Woman with Hen.  
 
Visited Ocracoke Island, Thursday January 15th, 1998  
 
Received denial of grant application for Ohio Fellowship January 23rd, 1998  
   
Speech given to Saint Agnes School on the occasion of the dedication of his portrait of Saint Agnes donated to the school by the Class of 1967, Friday January 23rd, 1998  
It gives me much pleasure to present this portrait of Saint Agnes for my graduating class of 1967. The donations of my classmates and teachers made this possible. I would like to thank the reunion committee, especially Mike Hebbler and Judy Recthin for their help. I would also like to recognize Mrs. Jon Votel for suggesting I come to the school and lecture the students on the process of painting the portrait Thank you also to Principal Hornblower, Kim Banta, Father Helman, Fr. Sterling and Sister Madonna for their input. A special thanks goes to my brother Chuck, without whose help this portrait could never have happened.  
You the students of Saint Agnes helped me paint this portrait by posing as Saint Agnes dressed up in the costume I supplied. Darlene & Tony Summe helped with the portrait by supplying pictures of Darlene when she was in eighth grade. I used those pictures for the basic look of Saint Agnes. I included all the detail I could in this painting. Each tree, shrub and blade of grass have been lovingly painted as if they were the same tree, shrub and blade of grass I too played by when I went to school here. I painted the school in this painting with the green house moved closer to the school so it could be part of the painting.  
 If you want to be an artist you have to study and understand all types of art. You will be creating very new and different types of art. Try and remember that there are very complicated reasons why art today is so strange and different. You will have to respect and understand all art in order to be a great artist.  
 Thank you again for the opportunity to work for St. Agnes School.  

 

Jackson Price, Oil on glass, 1.5" x 2", January 12th, 1998, Property of Linda Eubanks 
Painted as a match to a earlier oil on glass portrait done of his brother Dalton the age of one year. Each portrait is a very small portrait dressing up the baby with a Santa suit. The portrait can be viewed from either side.  

 

Sailplane with Cooper's Hawks, Watercolor on paper, 36" x 10", February 2nd, 1998, Property of Chuck Lohre
Painted from a description from Chuck Lohre while he was sailed above Lane's Flying School. He noticed a squadron of Cooper's Hawks flying along side of him. He saw that it was a mature female with two immatures. The painting shows Chuck Lohre's Schweitzer 1-36, white with blue stripe angled to the left as it neatly fits into the wide format. Above the sailplane are three clouds of varying size composing a lane or weather front. Off to the right is a squadron of Cooper's Hawks with the mother to the left and her two immature on the right.  

 

Groeber Home, Watercolor on paper, February 13th, 1998, 10" x 8", Property of Janet Groeber
Painted in exchange for a airline ticket to Baltimore. Traditional watercolor technique was used. A combination of washes carefully laid in without dragging the surface. Afterwards form was increased by outlining with a pen the various areas created by the washes.

  

Cooking, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", March 1st, 1998,
This and the next three artworks were preliminary work for the following group of four. After abandoning color, Tom went to a closer form of the type of artwork that his mentor, Thomas Rowlandson used in his artwork. He used India ink, sepia acrylic ink and the clear solution that formed on the top of a heavier yellow ink. The clear was used in mixing the four shades or tints of a single color that was a combination of India ink and the sepia color. The clear fluid acted as a binder and also allowed the ink to flow properly from the pen. Just water in a pen makes the tint bleed.  
 Tom had been of late been trying to reinvent himself to move in the rare air of high art. After intense study for several months He realized that high art needs to be controversial. As much as he resent this type of art he was destined to do it, He only needed a cause to work for. In the past he had proven successful in promoting other causes but never his own. He did not have a strong believe in cause. Now, he thinks he has a cause that he can pursue for years to come. It was right under his nose all along.  
 He wants to paint the victims of Alzheimer's. Irene Moore, his wife, had been so kind as to supply him with many photos of her mother as she was during the latter part of her life. These watercolors are the start of what He hope to be a long series of Alzheimer's portraits. As you notice one of the paintings is Mrs. Moore dressed up for Venice Carnival. He realizes that it may cause controversy. Controversy causes discussion. Maybe the discussion that results will be helpful.  
Gardening, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", February 21st, 1998, Valued at $150, Property of Tom Lohre 
 
Sitting, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", February 22nd, 1998, Property of Tom Lohre
 
Gardening, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", March 2nd, 1998, Property of Tom Lohre
 
Cooking, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", February 20th, 1998, Property of Tom Lohre, Valued at $150 
 
Venice Carnival, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", March 3rd, 1998, Property of Tom Lohre
 
Sitting, Watercolor on paper, 5" x 7", March 4th, 1998, Property of Tom Lohre
 
Venice, Watercolor on paper, 16" x 12", March 7th, 1998, Property of Alice & Michael Keys

Painted for Mrs. & Doctor Keys for the annual Cincinnati Alzheimer's Association Gala. The theme for this year was Venice Carnival. Carnival started in Venice but was outlawed by Napoleon. In 1980 the tradition was resurrected. This art shows a old Venice just before Carnival was banned.

This ends the first part of Tom's Life. The second part has no documentation. Continued art production with reduced sales and prices. Working full time as househusband then artist. Raising their daughter with his wife working full time. Reinventing himself.


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